The MiniBrew – First brewsession and review

This is the second (and very long) post I write about the MiniBrew brew system so if you haven’t read the first one, please do so now so that you are up to speed about the basic facts before reading the hands on experience and rewview.

The MiniBrew is designed to be a complete brew system with everything you need to brew, ferment and even serve beer. And it really is! Except for what’s in the boxes I only needed a big bowl to mix the malt in together with water and a jug to measure the correct amount of mash water. But to quote a famous man (that sadly passed away to soon): ”…but there is one more thing…” (Steve Jobs). You also need a smartphone and at the moment, you actually must have an iPhone to be able to even start the first rinsing cycle of the MiniBrew.

With your iPhone in hand and the unboxing done, the assemble of the system starts and there are many spare parts that need to be put together in the right order. Trub filters, gaskets, hopfilter, two mash tun filters, two lids, hopcarousel, small plastic coin-shaped things etc. The app will guide you through the process so it is not very difficult but still, I felt a bit like coming home from IKEA. The second time I put everything toghether it was easy doable even without the app so my initial fear of all the different parts was quickly erased.

With the parts in place and the water connected the rising cycle began. It is a wash cycle that cleanes first the base station (boiler, counter flow chiller etc) and then the SmartKeg. This rinsing takes some time but can be done in advance. After the brew day there is some water left in the base station which is one of the reasons for the pre-cleaning.

Start the brew
Before you can actually start a brew, you ned to scan a QR code on the BrewPack, which is the separate box of ingredients. The QR code will load the correct beer to be brewed with all the information about ingredients, mash program, boil program, hop additions, fermentation temperature and time, all the way to serving temperature. There is no way to change any of theses parameters with a BrewPack. You only get that freedom if you make your own recipe on the website, for which you need a yearly subscription to. The QR code is found on the inside of the BrewPack box and mine had a big chunk of glue on it to hold the lid closed while shipping, so I had to carefully remove that glue with most caution not to loose any black print. The QR codes are one time use only so you can’t save the code and brew another batch with your own ingredients.
The BrewPack contained a sachet of US05, six different hopbags and the bag of malt. The malt itself wasn’t crushed with much care since it had a lot of flour in it but that didn’t affect the mash cycle from what I could see. And since the malt is already crushed and there is dry yeast in the BrewPack, you should brew with it within a week or two. For me, it’s not a good plan to buy 5 of these packs and save them for later since crushed malt is deteriorating the same was as a banana; ”once you peel it – you better eat it!”.

Mashing in
Once the QR code is scanned and the system cleaned, it is time to mash in. Place the malt in a bucket or a very large bowl. The plate shown in the manual is waaay too small! Add the small amount of water (most of the water is already in the SmartKeg/Boiler) and put your hands down there to mix it well! It will be sticky and messy but on the other hand, it is the only part of the brew day when you will feel like you are actually brewing. This process is called “pre moisten” and it is used to avoid dough balls during the mash cycle. I guess you can use a spoon och whisk for this but for my first brewsession I wanted to follow the instructions.
Once everything is mixed well, the sticky malt is transferred to the mash tun which is pretty small for this task so there will probably be a little bit of a mess on your table.

The boil
Now the easy part begins. The mash cycle is running and since the mash tun is made of see through plastic you can watch the whole process. It’s like a little brewing aquarium! You follow the process and all the temperatures with your phone and the whole process is fully automated. The boil begins (which you can’t really see) and the hop carousel is doing the 1-6 hop additions. Here I had some problems. I followed the instructions and premoistened the hopbags (to make them heavier so that they would fall into the hop boiling filter) but still there was two hop bags out of six that got stuck. I think I tied up the small string with too much loose string hanging out from the knot and that got caught in the carousel somehow. The MiniBrew team is working on a better visual instruction for this section of the app and that should resolve the issue in the future (call this a beginners misstake). The beer I brewed was a “blonde beer” called Gulden Craen and Belgian Blonde is not a very hop forward beer style. Still the hop bags were still very filled with hops and I think the utilisation of the hops was impaired by the packed amount of hops, in other words; the bags where too small for that amount of hops in my opinion.

The boil is preformed invisibly and I’m not really sure exactly where (!) since no parts are very hot and there is minimum condensation. The boil must of course be done inside the base station somehow since there is no direct heating in the SmartKeg where the wort is and the hops are added, but it is impossible to see how the wort is run through the system and there are no images on the website that explains how the system works on the inside. As I said, there is hardly any water vapour or heat exhausted during the boil so there are no real clues about how the boil is preformed and also there can’t be a big amount of boil off.

Chilling the wort
After the boil, the chilling starts automatically since the water is constantly connected to the back of the base station. I have a pretty high water pressure in my house and when the cooling started, the shock wave sent through the system and the output hose, sprayed hot water over my sink (good thing I was in my brewery and not standing near the hose). My recommendation is to lock the output house down by something initially so no one gets hurt by boiling water. The cooling took the wort down from 100°C to 25°C in exactly 22 minutes. I asked the MiniBrew team about what kind of chiller it is and got the answer that it’s a counterflow chiller of some sort. Hard to tell how big it is since it’s inside the machine but with my high water pressure, it used a lot of water for this small amount of wort. The output water got cold very quickly so I can easily reduce the flow to about 2,5-3 liters per minute instead (according to the manufacturer). At 25°C, the app cancels the cooling so there is no way for me (at this time) to know if it is possible to chill down to 10°C for a cold pitch for a lager fermentation or if the modus operandi is to pitch at 25°C pitch for all yeasts. The SmartKeg takes over the chilling of the wort from 25°C down to the specified fermentation temperature of the recipe (22°C in this case for a US05) so the temperature is fully regulated through out the process but still I think it is a bit too high and for me, this time the water consumption was way too big…
The manufacturer is working on some sort of device that can recirculate ice water and get the water consumption down to 1.6:1 which would mean less than 10 liters of water (8-9,6 depending on post boil volume) for a normal batch.

Fermentation
Since there is warm or boiling wort in the SmartKeg, there is no need to sanitise the inside. Some other parts are sanitised with the supplied liquid and spray bottle. Then the dry yeast is added to the keg and after some shaking for oxygenating, the lid is placed on the keg together with an airlock instead of the regular pressure release valve between the keg ports. The app guides you through everything of course and it communicates with the SmartKeg individually without the basestaion. The fan on the backside of the SmartKeg makes a noise like an old 486 computer (remember those?) playing Quake so you don’t want to have this near your bedroom. It’s not loud but it is a somewhat irritating computerfan-like sound.

Cleaning
The brewday is about to end and all you have to do now is to throw away the malt in the recycling bin/compost, put all smaller parts in your dish washer and wash out the hop bags (they can also be washed in a laundry machine but avoid detergent and softeners). The bas station is cleaned by connecting the CIP kit together with a dish washer tablet (without the shiner fluid). The machine will clean and rinse everything for you so all that is left is to let everything dry. There is some water left in the machine so a small lid is placed on the connecting parts on the bottom of the base station where the SmartKeg/boiler is connected. This automated cleaning is very simple but I think that a CIP cycle of 60 minutes is a bit overkill for a small machine like this but I guess there have been lots of testing that came up with this amount of time. And since it’s automated, it doesn’t really matter that much (unless you or your kinds are eager to go to bed).

Fermentation
The fermentation, cold crash and lagering is all automated and you follow the process in the app. The only steps required from you along the way is to remove the airlock and replacing it with the safety pressure release valve, and removing/emptying the trub container a few times (they are flushed with CO2 every time to reduce oxidation). Different brews needs different amount of lagering/conditioning times so I can’t really tell you how long this process will take, it is decided in the recipe from the BrewPack. For my Belgian Blonde, it was about four weeks of total fermentation and conditioning. The review and tasting of the beer itself will come in a separate blog post in a few weeks time.

My thoughts, pros and cons
This review is based on my first brewday since I know you guys are very eager to hear my thoughts about it. Most of the issued I had during the brewday where user errors that I will avoid the next brewday. Some came from an unclear instruction from the app and some from me, missunderstanding some detail. The overall brewsession went well and I now feel like I don’t need to read all details in the app next brewsession. I would have liked to read all steps before actually performing them but there is no manual supplied with the machine and there is no one to be downloaded since the manufacturer is still updating the steps with the feedback from the users. I did however get a PDF after the brewday and that is the manuscript for the app. I would have liked to read that before the brewday but you guys have this review to familiarise yourselves with the brewing steps.

What I liked with the machine and the whole brewsystem
Complete package
The MiniBrew really is a complete package and not like any other system out there. Everything you need to brew, ferment and serve your beer is supplied! All you need is a measuring jug, a big bowl or bucket and your favourite beer glass! For beginners, I think the biggest improvement in their beers is controlled fermentation. Both the temperature itself but also having a stable temperature without fluctuations makes a huge impact on the final result.

Easy brewday
The machine and maybe even more so, the app, makes brewing beer very easy, even for the absolute beginner. I would have liked a little (i)-icon in some of the instructions for the beginner who wants to know why certain steps are performed but all in all it’s a very detailed guide and no one should have any fear of brewing with this system. It is very easy to follow the instructions and they will be even better when they add video to certain steps.

Excellent repetition
The MiniBrew makes repetitive brewing easy. Since every parameter is decided in the recipe and the process always looks the same, you can really fine tune your recipes like with no other system. Brewing free hand, or even with a machine like the Grainfather or Braumeister, will always add variabels that will change from brewsession to brewsession. All recipes are stored on the web page so you can easily brew the exact same beer infinite amount of times or just tweak it a little bit here and there.

Automated brewing
Sometimes, you are your own worst enemy. It is easy to screw up a brewday by forgetting things, miscalculate ingredients or boil offs. The MiniBrew takes you out of the ekvation pretty much and if you can follow the easy instructions, your brewday will be successful.

Nice appearance
The machine looks very nice and I wouldn’t mind having it out in the kitchen. It is fairly small but then again, I have a pretty large kitchen. It is very quiet during the brewday so that shouldn’t disturb anyone.
The app tells you exactly what time your next action is needed which makes planing of your day very easy. It only consumes 1 kw of power and doesn’t need a well ventilated place to brew at, so as long as you have a water supply and a a drain, you can brew anywhere. A brewsession can be done under 4 hours and 8% beers are possible to brew so there is some flexibility there.

Portable
Want to brew outside? Want to bring the system to a friend for a brewsession? The system might not fit in a backpack but it is portable enough to place where ever you want to brew and when it’s time for storage it will fit in a closet.

The smart SmartKeg
The SmartKeg really is an improvement to your average Cornelius keg. Built in cooling and heating, all controllable by wifi is neat. It is also insulated but I do not know with what (vacuum?). There is also the bottom valve that you can use for removing trub and also helps a lot with cleaning. Serving directly from the fermenter reduces oxidation but also eliminates the transferring step and the cleaning.

What I don’t like with the machine and the whole brewsystem
There are three main things i disliked with the MiniBrew:

Price
There’s no point in avoiding the elephant in the room. This is a system that will cost you a big chunk of money to get you started. If that means that it is expensive or not is up to you but I really think you need to consider that it is a complete brewery package that is very hightech with the app and all wifi connections. The MiniBrew system is a brewing software, a guiding brewer hanging over your shoulder (the app) a mashtun, an automated boiler, a counterflow wort chiller, a fermentation vessel, a fermentation fridge, a keg, a portable kegerator, a CO2 regulator and so on. The price needs to be compared to a whole home brewery and not just a mash/wort-machine. But then again, it is a lot of money and if you are a beginner who doesn’t really know if this hobby is for you, the price tag will scare some people. Here in Sweden, the currency Krona is very weak at the moment which doesn’t help either.
The BrewPacks on the other hand are expensive. Yes they are prepackaged with all ingredients you need and the recipe to execute the brewday and fermentation but the price of cheapest packs at 18 € (without shipping!) for roughly 5 liters of beer which equals out to 3,6€ per liter. If I scale that up to my regular batchsizes (we’re only talking ingredients here, not water/electricity/labour etc) that would cost me more that 200€ per brewday. On the other hand 3,6€ for two large (0,5l) premium craft beers is cheap compared to your local hipster bar but this is homebrewed beer from a machine that wasn’t cheap to begin with. The BrewPacks are great for the beginners but I think many people want to start using their own ingredients pretty soon, purely out of cost perspective. To be able to brew your own beers you need to pay a subscription fee to access the MiniBrew software on the website. It is not possible to make a recipe with the app, that can only be done on the website. I can’t find the subscription fee on the MiniBrew webshop but on my LHBS Humlegården, it costs the equivalent to 90€ per year which I think should be a one time fee.

Locked system that is also dependable on the manufacturer staying in business
The MiniBrew system is like an iPhone; it’s tech savy, well designed in both user experience and physical design but the management of the system is locked away from the user. If you buy the subscription to the website you can tweak some software parameters but you’re pretty much stucked with the hardware part.
If you are like me, a little pessimistic about the future, you might wonder what will happen to your MiniBrew if the manufacturer goes out of business or get bought up etc, in other words, how the machine will work without the active running servers of the MiniBrew team. Quick answer: “it won’t!”. There is no way to even start a cleaning cycle without the MiniBrew servers for the time being so I really hope that the company will still support this system in 10-15 years from now. Otherwise the machine would be completely useless. I hope there will be a standalone app for wither phone or computer in there future so that the system is “future proof” even though it goes against the main idea about the whole system being integrated with the guide and webshop. The same thought applies to third party brewpacks, they will not work unless you treat them like your own recipe on the MiniBrew website (which yet again, requires the subscription).

Batchsize
The 5 liter size of the batches are too small for me but also for many brewers out there. Bring a friend or two and you will easily be able to finish a whole batch in one evening. I would have preferred at least 10 liters of beer for the time spent brewing and cleaning all parts.

Smaller things I dislike:

Water
The MiniBrew base station is supposed to be connected to a water tap throuhout the whole brewday which for many brewers mean that they can’t use their kitchen while brewing. I’m sure you could disconnect the waterhose from the start of the mash until the end of the boil but it is not something the app tells you.
Cooling down the wort in 22 minutes is ok at best. Cooling down 5 liters of wort in 22 minutes to 25°C is very slow. I will measure again when my tap water is colder and see if I can do this step faster and with less water.

Efficiency
I calculated the efficiency with 1728 gram of malt at OG 1.056 for 5,5 liters to 58% and to 5 liters to 53% (since there is no way to measure the batchsize). Either case the 53-58% range is very low. The website says the process of mashing from below and up gives you high efficiency but that was not the case for me this time. I can’t review the efficiency of the machine based of just one brewsession, more datapoints need to be gathered.

According to the MiniBrew team, it should be possible to complete a brewsession in 4 hours but for me this particular day, it took over 7 hours. They say that it depends on both recipe and water temperature and of course I need more data points to draw any conclusion in this matter.

Hop bags
I’m not very fond of the small hop bags that, in my opinion, are too small for the amount of hop that you add and they are “fiddly” (“pilliga” in Swedish) to load. I would have perferred loose hops instead, which I saw the inventor use with a prototype machine on Youtube. So this might be an option but I haven’t inquired about that yet.

Cleaning
I don’t like that there is water left in the machine after a brew session. This water will be rinsed before next brew but I don’t think it’s good for the machine in the long run (thinking of rust and scale build up). Two dish washer tablets per brew and one for cleaning the keg when it’s done is a lot of detergent for 5-6 liters of beer.

Small parts
The system contains and depends on many small parts (mostly filters and gaskets) that can brake or get lost. There’s no way to brew if you’re missing just one little piece and if something break on a brewday, you won’t be able to buy a replacement part on your local hardware store in a rush. These components are especially designed for the machine and must be purchased from the manufacturer.

The app and the guide
The machine is very dependent on the app. Several times I had a problem with my wifi since I brew in my basement and network connection is less than perfect. Still my Braumeisters wifi works fine and we’re watching Netflix in the room next to the brewery every night without a problem. The text ”Loading brewing data” in 10 second segments happened 4-5 times during the day. The images in the app are a bit small even with my large iPhone and there is no dedicated iPad app so there is no way to view the images larger. The video guides that will be available in the future will be a great addition to the guide.

Summary and comments
I think there will definitely be a big customer base loving this machine and the beers from it. Having a modern, constantly refined and updated guide that helps you with your brewday and the whole fermentation really is great. The fermentation control is great and I think most brewers will crank out good to great beer from day one with this device. Being able to repeatedly brew the same recipe over and over, with or without fine tuning the recipe, will appeal many experienced brewers who are already confident in their process and just want to experiment with recipes and new ingredients. Or people who just wants a big variety of craft beers at home (or at the office).
Development of a whole system like this, both hardware and software, is difficult and costly which is reflected in the price tag just like you can get 54 (!) Nokia 105 phones for the price of just one highend iPhone 11. The Nokia even has a standby time of 25 days and you will be able to make a call with both phones but that’s where the comparison ends if you get my analogy; modern technology costs money.

For me, it is too early to say if my conclusion is that I like the system and/or will use it in the long run. I simply need to brew with it more times before I can make a conclusion like that. The small batchsizes of the MiniBrew means I need another system due to pure beer consumption in our household since both me, may family and friends are quite thirsty. I enjoyed brewing with the system even though I had some minor issues during my first brewday. I hope that my review can provide you with enough facts about the MiniBrew system to help you make your own decision whether it fits you or not. I will document more brewsession with it in the future and also review the beers from it but that will take some more time of course.

The two beers I will try first with the MiniBrew, a Belgian Blond and an IPA.

The starter pack contains CO2-canisters and some other small parts needed like sanitation liquid.

Water connection is a regular ”Gardena type” that is commonly available in your local hardware store.

Sadly this happened a few times during the brewday.

This is both the rinsing- and CIP-device. You put a dish washing tablet inside and connect the two hoses. The machine does the rest.

I had some leakage from my tap so I switched the hose to my regular gardena garden hose instead. This error was due to my old tap.

Rinsing cycle is on its way. I had some smaller leakage from the yellow connector and it was a manufacturing error so I got a new one from the MiniBrew team.

Here I connected a standard Gardena barb to the machine.

This is the base og the machine and the ”trub filter” for the boil later on.

This is upper the inlet and outlet of the base station. The left one is still filled with water from the rinsing.

BrewPack of the day, the ”Gulden Craen” blonde.

Supplied ingredients in the box; maltbag, 6 hopadditions and one bag of US05 dry yeast.

The bags are all numbered so that the right hop goes into the right compartment in the hop carousel.

1,725 kg of malt.

This is my onetime QR code with the glue on it. Not a big problem this time but if the print would have come off, there would be a big problem since there is no other way to execute the brew.

Water to pre rinse the SmartKeg.

This process is manual for some reason. I guess the machine canät really tell how much water that goes into the SmartKeg for the cleaning cycle.

Pressure release valve is placed in sanitiser to be used again i over two weeks.

Place the lid back on the SmartKeg for cleaning.

The yellow plastic part with the two regular Cornelius ballvalve connectors are used for the keg rinsning. In the background you see the tap handle that connects directly to the black ball valve 1/4″ flare connector.

Because of some air trapped in the base station, I had to cancel the brew and start over. Unfortunately I couldn’t skip the rinsing cycle so I had to do that twice. This should not happen according to the manufacturer. The second time it worked immediately.

 

The spray bottle with sanitizer had a very long hose to it.

I had to cut off about 5 cm before I could close the hat of the bottle.

The hop bags are actually reusable cotton TEA-bags.

One of the bags were open upon arrival.

Second ”unnecessary” cleaning of the SmartKeg.

 

The the hop filter is added to the SmartKeg. This filter will catch both the hop bags and the yellow plastic discs from the hop carousel (more about these later).

The amount of flour in the malt bag.

Add malt to a bowl.

Add some water (amount is specified in the app).

Now get down and dirty!

Mix it well!

And then transfer it to the mash tun. Observe the mess outside of the mashtun. This could certainly be avoided with some care.

Mashtun is connected above the SmartKeg.

Hop carousel with half of the hop bags added.

The hop bags are washed in water to add some weight to them.

Mash cycle begins.

All you have to do now is to wait.

The mash is done and the wort is moved to the SmartKeg below the mash tun.

The lid isn’t a very tight fit in the beginning but I guess that the gaskets holding the mash tun in place will wear after a while.

I had some wort on the base after the SmartKeg was removed. I think the gasket was a bit too new or something like that.

The yeast is still not added since the wort is still a bit too warm. The black part of the SmartKeg is the fan and it is continuing the cooling of the wort.

Time to CIP the base station.

Yes it got a bit messy there for a while.

As I mentioned, I got a new CIP unit so this shouldn’t happen again. After the cleaning, the black lid to the right is placed on the yellow connector because of the water left in the MiniBrew base station.

These are all the spare parts that needs to dry after the brewday. Yes it’s a lot of stuff!

 

 

Screenshots

Here are a lot of screenshots from the MiniBrew app during the brewday and the fermentation. I tried to capture them all but I have probably missed a few of them due to the massive amount!

 

This was no good!

This is what happened when I had air in the system. The MiniBrew tried to resolve the problems a couple of times before it aborted and I had to start all over. This added quite some time to my brewday.

 

I wish I could have skipped this step since the machine was already cleaned just a few minutes before!

This happened a few times during the day. I think it was mainly because of my internet connection.

Here they actually use a spoon but in the instruction films on Youtube you are supposed to use your hands. Either way, the bowl in the picture above is too small!

These are the ”yellow coin-like discs” that is helping the hopbags to drop.

This is how the Brewery Portal looks like:

Du har väl inte missat min bok om ölbryggning? Köp den hos Humlegården!



Annons:
swish-e1439054456319 Gillar du Lindh Craft Beer? Vill du hjälpa till att hålla site:en vid liv och se fler inlägg?
Då kan du skicka en donation via Swish på Swishnummer 0700 827038.
Pengarna går oavkortat till brygg- och bloggrelaterade utgifter och inget bidrag är för stort eller för litet. Tack!

The MiniBrew

This blog post and the following posts about the MiniBrew will be in english to please a larger audience.

What is the MiniBrew?
The MiniBrew is an all in one brewing system. That means, in comparison to machines like the Grainfather or the Braumeister, that it produces ready-to-drink beer and not only wort. The MiniBrew will mash, lauter, boil, add hops, chill, ferment, cold crash, lager and serve. All in one machine!
The MiniBrew really is mini in the sense that it is fairly small (like a huuuge Nespressomachine, 58x48x30cm) but the name mostly comes from the batch sizes of 5 to 5,5 liters. The thought behind that is that machine is so easy to brew with that you can make many batches and have a large variety of beers instead of just one bigger batch. The beer is served directly from the SmartKeg from which the wort was both boiled and fermented in. The keg has a built in cooling and heating system which regulates the temperature of the fermentation and the beer. It also has wifi and its own integrated software so you can monitor the whole process from your smartphone. It is possible to have many SmartKegs running at the same time so once the wort is chilled, you remove the SmartKeg and start the fermentation while you can add a new SmartKeg to the MiniBrew base station and begin brewing your next batch.

Who is it for?
The MiniBrew is designed for absolute beginners who wants an easy complete system to brew craft beer and a guiding hand to hold through out the whole process, all the way from grain to glass. It is also designed as a pilot brewery for the experienced brewer (or even commercial brewer) who wants to be able to develop new styles and recipes in a simple and controlled way with precision in repetition so that fine tuning the ingredients and the process is possible.

Control
The MiniBrew is controlled by the MiniBrew app which is currently only available on iOS but an Android app is on the way. There is no way to control the machine without the app and an internet connection (to both app and the MiniBrew) but the machine will run by itself to the next step without both, so a failure in the wifi connection is not a problem. From within the app you order your ingredients (or Brewpacks as they are called) which contains all you need to brew the chosen beer. There are eleven different beers at the moment both there are many more under development together with established breweries. You can also develop your own recipes, which require a computer and the “Brewery portal website” instead of the app, and also brew with your own ingredients. That feature is not widely released yet even though I have been granted access for testing purposes.
The app is made both for controlling the brew session/fermentation both also as a step-by-step guide through the whole process. The app will show you every step of the way, from mashing in and all the way to serving and cleaning, in detail with text and images. There will also be small film sequences in the app in the near future. You can control the MiniBrew and the SmartKeg from both the Brewery Portal Website or the smartphone app. Together or individually, meaning you can start with one and continue with the other if you like.

How to brew with the MiniBrew
Preparation
Before you start a brew session, the MiniBrew will do a self clean ”rinsing cycle” with the supplied CIP-system. All you need to do is to add a dish washing tablet to the machine and connect it to your water tap. The machine will both clean and rinse itself and the cleaning process takes about an hour, depending on your current tap water temperature. After that, the SmartKeg is fitted into the base station and it will also do a self clean. When that’s done, all parts are assembled and you are ready to start the brew session.

Mashing, boiling, cooling
The SmartKeg is filled with an exact amount of water. Grain is mixed (with your hands!) with a small amount of water in a separate bowl before it is added to the small mash tun. Some more parts and filters are assembled and hops are added to the hop carousel. Press start on your phone and the machine will now do the mash with multiple mash steps, the boil including up to 6 hop additions and the cooling before your attention is needed again. Depending on recipe, this will take 2-4 hours.

Fermenting
When you come back to the MiniBrew, you remove the mashtun and hop filter, add the yeast and close the lid. After a short aeration done by shaking the keg, your wort is now entering the different fermentation stages and with only a few more steps (like removing the yeast/trub container and switching out the airlock to a regular keg safety valve) spread out over the next weeks, your beer will be ready to drink.

Serving
If you can close the SmartKeg, in the right time, your beer will carbonate itself by spunding. That means that the final gravity points from fermentation will naturally carbonate the beer. For an ale, that time frame is very difficult to match so the main carbonation is done by a small CO2 canister with the supplied mini regulator. The same device is also used for driving out the beer when serving it from the SmartKeg with the supplied tap handle that connects directly to the keg.

Cleaning
After the brewing session, the spare parts like the mash tun and the different filters can be put in a normal household dishwasher while the CIP system is once again connected to the MiniBrew for cleaning. After you have finished all your beer, the SmartKeg needs to be cleaned which is a bit more manual process with some scrubbing with a brush.

Versions and price
The MiniBrew is sold in three different bundles that all contains the base station;
MiniBrew Craft – one SmartKeg with one taphandle and one CO2 regulator for 1199€ (all prices are without shipping)
MiniBrew Thirsty Office – five SmartKegs, one tap handle and one CO2 regulator. 2599€
MiniBrew Craft Pro – three SmartKegs, three tap handles, three CO2 regulators and full access to the Brewery Portal Software (which I don’t know if you get with the other bundles), 1999€.

The BrewPacks costs between 17.99€ and 29.99€ depending on beer style. You can also add more SmartKegs later and they cost 389€ each including tap handle and CO2 regulator.
(all pricing is taken from the MiniBrew webshop in october 2019 and they might change in the future)

The MiniBrew will be available through the MiniBrew webshop with possible local distributors added in the future. In Sweden, Humlegårdens Ekolager has the units and also the BrewPacks in stock.

My first brew session and my thoughts about the MiniBrew system
I have brewed once with the MiniBrew and really gone into great detail documenting how the system works, how to brew with it and I also reviewed all its pros and cons together with my first impressions. The whole brewday was so well documented, with lots of pictures and text, so that it will be featured in a separate blog post due to its length. So stay tuned, there is more to come!

The MiniBrew fits very well in our kitchen. It’s design and appearance is ”wife approved”.

Small footprint even if it is bigger than most kitchen appliances.

The main parts (from left): mash tun, hop carousel, lid, base unit and SmartKeg (without the stand).

The inside of the base units with all the connections.

The back side. The white is water in, then water out and to the far right is the power button. On the second row is an environment temperature sensor.

The SmartKeg standing on its ”tripod” or stand.

On this image, there is no CO2 tube connected (since this keg is empty right now). The connectors are the very common Corenlius keg ports and one can easily use other accessories (even though the manufacturer advise against it for safety reasons regarding the pressure release valve being rated at 2,5-3 bars).

The backside of the SmartKeg with the cooling/heating. The silver button is the power.

The SmartKeg has a lever to open the bottom both for cleaning and also removal of yeast and trub.

The inside of the keg with the bottom valve closed.

Bottom valve open…

…and closed.

The taphandle is without any flow restriction so the only way to regulate flow is by adjusting the CO2 pressure.

The beer port of the keg is connected to a silicone hose instead of the steel ones that Corny’s use.

This is the small adjustable CO2 regulator for the very small CO2 canisters.

This is not a paid advertisement and (as usual) I am not paid by the manufacturer of this product to write these posts. My thoughts about this product is my own and I try to be as neutral and objective (in my own subjective way) as I can.

Du har väl inte missat min bok om ölbryggning? Köp den hos Humlegården!



Annons:
swish-e1439054456319 Gillar du Lindh Craft Beer? Vill du hjälpa till att hålla site:en vid liv och se fler inlägg?
Då kan du skicka en donation via Swish på Swishnummer 0700 827038.
Pengarna går oavkortat till brygg- och bloggrelaterade utgifter och inget bidrag är för stort eller för litet. Tack!

Lindhs Kellerbier

När de Tyska bryggerierna förr i tiden skulle lagra sina öl var de tvungna att göra det i enorma jordkällare i brist på avancerad kylteknik (vi snackar 1500-tal här). Men för att ytterligare sänka temperaturen lite planterade de stora kastanjeträd eller lindar för att skugga marken ovanför lagringskällaren, lagerkeller på Tyska. Denna mysiga skuggia plats, några träbänkar och närheten till stora mängder öl gav såklart upphov till Biergartens. Ölen som serverades kallades för Kellerbier eftersom den kom direkt från källaren och direkt från lagertanken. Kellerbier är alltså från början inte en egen ölstil, utan var “smygprover” från det som låg och lagrades och senare skulle tappas på flaska eller träfat. Ölet var med andra ord inte riktigt färdigt och därför disigt, ofiltrerat och ibland med lägre kolsyrehalt.

Idag kan man köpa Kellerbier på flaska långt ifrån både bryggeri och lagringskällare och eftersom namnet börjar bli populärt igen är det många som sätter det på en disig lager i brist på möjlighet att lagra eller få det genomskinligt, lite som att session-IPA säljer bättre än APA. Kellerbier är stilmässigt nära släkt med både Zwickelbier eller Zoigl bier och är ofta gyllengula, rustika öl åt helleshållet men ibland lite mer humlebetonade och ibland något mörkare beroende på region. Beskan är låg men något högre än helles, 15-25 ibu, och viss restsötma brukar avsluta.

Namnet Zwickelbier kommer från en ”Zwickel” (betyder typ sticka) eller tappkran i trä som man slår in i en öltunna. Zoigl är den sexkantiga stjärna som restauranger på 1500-talet hängde upp utanför restaurangen för att visa att man hade öl till servering. Ofta bryggdes Zoigl i en sorts föreningsliknande verksamhet där de många mindre bryggare bryggde vörten tillsammans men tog med sig sin egna vört hem och jäste.

Lindhs Kellerbier, vad är då det?
Det var lite historisk bakgrund till Kellerbier som fenomen och den ligger även delvis till grund för min tanke med denna öl. Jag vill ha ett lättdrucket bordsöl som inte behöver ta upp plats i min lagringsfrys under så lång tid. Den får gärna vara lite enklare både att brygga och jäsa. Den ska bryggas i lite större mängd än mina vanliga lågsyresatser eftersom det här är ett öl för stora sejdlar som ska drickas, inte analyseras i små ISO-glas. Halmgul till gyllengul och en alkoholhalt på 4,5-5%. Medellåg restsötma (1.008-1.010) och en beska runt 20-30 IBU enligt Beersmith, vilket för mig brukar vara 5-10 IBU mindre i slutprodukten vilket är anledningen till att ni ofta ser något högre IBU i mina recept än vad som skulle anses vara mitt i typdefinitionen. Helt enkelt en lite rustikare Helles som inte behöver lagras så länge och inte behöver läggas lite mycket precision på. Som en sista liten knorr skulle gärna jästemperaturen få vara några grader högre så det går snabbare att jäsa ut den men även lättare att brygga på sommaren med det varmare kranvattnet, men det får några testrundor avgöra hur mycket det påverkar smaken.

Första försöket
Denna bryggning får ses som en halvtafflig testomgång då jag helt missbedömde inventarierna hemma när jag komponerade receptet under en jobbresa. Jag brukar sedan en tid bara köpa hem det jag behöver för kommande tre bryggningar och jag trodde jag hade ytterligare lite extra malt hemma som blivit över, så var det inte riktigt. Jag saknade både basmalt och den ljusa karamellmalt jag tänkt använda så jag fick helt enkelt ösa ner allt jag kunde uppbringa, förutom Carafan då såklart. Receptet i slutet av inlägget behöver ni inte brygga med andra ord eftersom det bara är en skåpsrensning och ingen direkt tanke bakom. Grundreceptet för min Kellerbier kommer se ut något i stil med 90-95% pilsnermalt och resten Carahell, eventuellt lite Münchner och lite CaraMünich II. Absolut inte 1 kg vetemalt!

För att göra bryggningen snabbare och enklare så skippade jag lågsyremetoden och värmde därför bara upp vattnet till 62°C för inmäskning, inget förkok med andra ord. Jag sänkte dock ner maltröret som vanligt med hjälp av vinschen eftersom jag nu är van vid den metoden nu och det går snabbt och enkelt. Jag rörde om lite mer i malten än vid lågsyrebryggning, mest för att det var mer malt i än jag brukar ha. Mäskningen körde jag som vanligt en trestegsraket med först 45 min på betaamylasområdet 63°, sedan 30 minuter på alfaamylasområdet 72° för att avsluta på en “utmäskningsrast” 76° i 10 minuter. Sista rasten ger eventuellt lite extra skjuts för alfaamylas på väg upp i temperatur innan den denaturerar betaamylasenzymerna, vilket egentligen mest är till glädje för den som lakar väldigt lång tid (dvs timmar). Men vörten ska ju ändå värmas till kok och mäskprogrammet i min Braumeister är redan förprogrammerat för det här programmet som brukar kallas HochKurz (tyska för hög, kort). Efter mäskprogrammet lakade jag med hjälp av min Blichmann Riptidepump. Jag lyfte maltröret steg för steg allteftersom vätskenivån steg gör att minska plaskandet så mycket som möjligt. Men för att få en kokvolym på uppåt 75-80 liter måste maltröret i slutet av lakningen stå ovanpå bryggverket och här har IKEA ett väldigt bra grytgaller som lämpligt nog heter Lämplig, som jag brukar använda till detta. Mäskvattenvolymen var ca 60 liter och jag lakade med ungefär 20 liter minus det som blev kvar i pump, slangar och plattvärmeväxlare som jag passade på att spola ur med varmvatten. För att ytterligare förenkla bryggdagen kokade jag humlen i en humlestrumpa. Den var dock alldeles för liten trots liten humlemängd så efter ett tag flyttade jag över humlen till min BIAB-påse istället. Efter kokslut tog jag bort humlepåsen, gjorde en whirlpool i 10 minuter och kylde sedan till 20°C snabbt och smidigt med plattvärmeväxlaren.

Med så här mycket vört (75 liter efter kok) visste jag att allt inte skulle få plats i min jäskyl utan att möblera om och krångla. Därför passade jag på att tappa vörten till två 19l Corneliusfat för att testa “unitank-metoden”, vilket innebär att man jäser och serverar ut samma kärl. Detta kräver en behållare som klarar tryck så testa inte detta med en jäshink eller liknande! Eftersom det är ett stigarrör i fatet är tanken att man ska kunna tömma ut merparten av jästkakan den vägen och låta vörten kolsyra sig självt genom spundning, alltså att man stänger igen fatet när det är 3-5°Ö extrakt kvar. Det är klokt att ha ett Spundingvalve (reglerbar övertrycksventil med manometer på) så man inte bygger sig en cornybomb! Utfallet av det här har jag ingen aning om men jag tänker mig att om det är någon öl denna metod passar bra till så är det en Kellerbier som kan få vara disig och inte ska ligga så länga på fat att autolys hinner bli ett problem. Veteöl skulle såklart kunna lämpa sig rent estetiskt för att jäsa i serveringsfatet men dess höga kreusen kommer garanterat att ställa till problem, testa gärna och skicka bilden till mig sen!

Mitt OG landade på 1.045 vilket jag förvisso beräknat men även hoppats på då det är lite högre än vid mina LoDO-bryggningar. På 13,1kg malt och 75 liter vört ger det en brygghuseffektivitet på 83% denna gång vilket är ganska högt. Beersmith är även uselt på att beräkna FG och tycker att 1.007 verkar rimligt trots 8,4% karamellmalt. Det skulle då ge en alkoholhalt på 5,1% men jag tror att 1.010 är mer rimligt vilket istället ger ca 4,7% ABV. Oavsett alkoholhalt så är det bara någon vecka bort till någon slags provsmakning och utvärdering, trots vetemalt, trots Carared, trots 2 EBC för hög färg, trots massiv lakning, trots varm lagerjäsning, trots humlepåse und so weiter…

Flytt av vatten från bryggverk till kastrull för att kunna mäska in smidigare.

Nödkomplettering av maltnotan när jag insåg att basmalten är kort nästan två kilo.

Min nya klockrena paketvåg som gör vägningen av malt så mycket smidigare (och därmed roligare) än förr. Visst kan den svaja några gram hit och dit men vad gör 15 maltkorn för skillnad på 55-75 liter?

Krossning på 0,8mm som vanligt. Jag är sugen på att smyga mig lite nedåt ytterligare i spaltbredd men inte när jag ska ha i några kilo malt mer än jag brukar. Det får bli en annan gång.

Dags för inmäskning på ”mitt sätt” vilket innebär att jag inte sänker ner hela maltröret i vattnet som manualen säger. Utan jag låter maltröret vila halvvägs ner så vattennivån är under de nedre filterdiskarna. Sen häller jag i all malt och sänker sakta ner röret i vattnet, rör om försiktigt och stänger igen med LOB-kittet. Sen på med några liter vatten och det flytande locket.

Mängden malt, drygt 13,1 kg, vilket jag hade tänkt mig skulle varit 14 kg. Det hade dock kunnat bli i starkaste laget för detta bordsöl.

Maltröret nedsänkt.

Mäsken omrörd, filterdiskar på plats och vatten påfyllt. Start för mäskprogrammet och dags för kafferast i två timmar.

Efter mäskprogrammets slut.

Helt omöjligt att fota när jag lakar men tänk er att jag står med en silikonslang i ena handen och snöret till vinschen i andra. Med slangen fördelar jag vattnet ovanpå röret och maltbädden medan jag med andra handen sakta drar i snöret så maltröret tillslut är nästan helt ovanför Braumeistern. Då placerar jag IKEA-gallret under röret och låter sista vörten på ett förfärligt sätt droppa ner i koket.

Dags för disk av filter. Jag är sugen på att stoppa de här filtrena i diskmaskinen istället. Någon av er som gör det?

Detta var första bryggnignen med nya ”Roller Base” från Speidel, plastgrunkan som Braumeistern står på. Den fungerade riktigt bra både vid bryggning och för att smidigt diska bryggverket. CIP, inga lyft och pumphusen var riktigt enkla att öppna och göra rent efter bryggdagen. Jag kunde tom spola ur rören ner till pumphusen när pumparna var bortplockade. Diskvattnet samlade jag upp med en liten skål under Roller Base. Väldigt smutt!

Dessutom kan jag med något lägre ”bryggverkspall” använda helt raka ventilationsrör istället för det flexibla. Tyckte att det fungerade riktigt bra men detta var första gången så jag får utvärdera bytet lite längre fram.

Första humlepåsen som blev väldigt full trots endast 50 gram humle.

Byte till den betydligt större BIAB-påsen.

Kylning av vört påväg till jäshink och fat.

Slutresultatet av dagen, drygt 40 liter i en jäshink och 2×15 liter i två Carneliusfat.

Lindhs Kellerbier (Helles)

Batchsize: 75.00 l
OG: 1.045 SG
FG: 1.007 SG
Alcohol by volume: 5.1 %
Bitterness: 24.7 IBUs
Color: 10.3 EBC

Water Prep

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
20.00 ml Lactic Acid (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 1
7.00 g Antioxin SBT (Mash 0.0 mins) Water Agent 2
6.00 g Calcium Chloride (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 3
2.00 g Salt (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 4

Mash Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
11054 g Barke Pilsner (Weyermann) (4.0 EBC) Grain 5 84.1 %
801 g Wheat Malt, Pale (Weyermann) (3.9 EBC) Grain 6 6.1 %
772 g Carahell (Weyermann) (25.6 EBC) Grain 7 5.9 %
325 g Caramunich II (Weyermann) (124.1 EBC) Grain 8 2.5 %
163 g Acidulated (Weyermann) (3.5 EBC) Grain 9 1.2 %
29 g Carared (Weyermann) (47.3 EBC) Grain 10 0.2 %

Total amount of malt: 13144 g

Mash Steps

Name

Description

Step Temperature

Step Time
Mash in Add 91.06 l of water and heat to 62.0 C over 0 min 62.0 C 0 min
Beta-Amylase Heat to 63.0 C over 13 min 63.0 C 45 min
Alpha-Amylase Heat to 72.0 C over 11 min 72.0 C 30 min
Mash Out Heat to 76.0 C over 8 min 76.0 C 5 min

If steeping, remove grains, and prepare to boil wort

Boil Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
50 g Perle [6.00 %] – Boil 30.0 min Hop 11 8.4 IBUs
150 g Perle [6.00 %] – Boil 15.0 min Hop 12 16.3 IBUs
6.60 g Yeast Nutrient (Boil 10.0 mins) Other 13
1.80 g Protafloc (Boil 10.0 mins) Other 14
10.00 ml Lactic Acid (Boil 10.0 mins) Water Agent 15

Total amount of hops: 200 g

Fermentation Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
3.0 pkg Bavarian Lager Yeast 16

Recommended starter size: 8.88 l / 1267.9 Billion cells.

Du har väl inte missat min bok om ölbryggning? Köp den hos Humlegården!



Annons:
swish-e1439054456319 Gillar du Lindh Craft Beer? Vill du hjälpa till att hålla site:en vid liv och se fler inlägg?
Då kan du skicka en donation via Swish på Swishnummer 0700 827038.
Pengarna går oavkortat till brygg- och bloggrelaterade utgifter och inget bidrag är för stort eller för litet. Tack!

Speidel Roller Base till Braumeister 50

Jag är alltid på jakt efter saker som gör bryggeriet snyggare, renare och effektivare att arbeta i. Jag är också intresserad av allt som förenklar tråkiga och jobbiga moment under bryggdagen så jag kan ägna mig åt det kreativa och precisionen i några av de mer kritiska bryggmomenten. En tråkig avslutning på min bryggdag har länge varit att vända uppochner på bryggverket för att få ut sista diskvattnet från rören och pumparna samt plocka isär pumparna för att torka ur. Tungt, tråkigt, ofta blaskigt och har egentligen inget med ölet att göra. Jag har fått testa en ”Roller Base” eller kanske basstation på hjul på svenska (?) som Speidel själva tagit fram till Braumeister 50 (om det kommer något liknande till 20-litersmodellen är oklart i dagsläget).

Roller base är gjort av rejäl plast och den väger faktiskt en hel del så jag antar att den är av solid plast, annars skulle den inte klara av de 120 kilona den är specad för. Den har tre upphöjda ”antifötter” som gör att Braumeistern kommer upp mycket högre än om den står på plant underlag vilket gör att man med lätthet kan skruva isär pumphusen efter en bryggdag. De här upphöjningarna har en kant runt om som förhindrar bryggverket att kunna röra sig ur position. I botten av Roller base finns en ränna som leder till ett hål med invändiga, rostfria 3/4″-gängor. Ett avlopp helt enkelt och med en tappkran eller en slangnippel kan man ansluta det hela till en slang man kopplar till avloppet. Jag tänker mig att det inte blir så mycket vört och diskvatten som kommer ta sig den här vägen så en liten kanna eller bytta räcker nog långt. Tanken från Speidel är att avloppet ska vara rakt framåt men det går lika bra att ha det på sidan under bottenkranen om man vill (se bilder nedan).

Hela Roller Base står på fyra låsbara hjul av riktigt kraftig modell. Alla hjul går att låsa och rotera fritt vilket gör bryggverket smidigt att förflytta så man kan hålla rent och snyggt i bryggeriet. Under bryggningen ska man dock vara noga med att låsa alla hjul så inte 70 liter kokande lava börjar rulla iväg! Jag är redan väldigt förtjust i Roller Base och tror den kommer bli en storsäljare bland BM50-bryggare därute…

Speidels Roller Base kommer vara svart och inte vit som prototypen jag testat. Den ska gå att köpa från och med 10e oktober och kommer kosta runt 140 € plus frakt från Speidels Webshop men jag tror säkert de svenska bryggbutikerna kommer ta in detta fina tillbehör.

De fyra hjulen levereras omonterade så ha en torxmejsel redo för montering. Ett tips är att dra alla skruvar lite grann först innan man skruvar i resten, annars kan ett skruvhål bli täckt av metall och man får lossa på alla skruvar igen.

Som sagt, ”antifötter” eller upphöjdnad i brist på bättre ord. Detta trodde jag skulle vara den största svagheten i konstruktionen men det känns väldigt stabilt och förtroendeingivande, utan risk för att Braumeistern ska glida eller hamna i fel position. Öppningarna gör att eventuell vört eller vatten inte samlas utan rinner ner mot avloppsrännan.

Här är rännan och avloppet som är pluggat vid leverans för gängornas skull antar jag.

Avloppet underifrån.

En tappkran av svart modell passar direkt i dessa gängor. Även Speidels egna rostfria kranar passar direkt men om någon kran behövs eller inte beror på hur ens bryggeri ser ut.

Här är avloppet i sidoposition dvs till höger i bild.

Rejält luftigt mellan botten och pumphusen.

Avståndet är dock inte för långt så pumparna hänger och vilar i sladden. Man bör dock se till att de inte ligger i vatten.

 

Höjden är något lägre än både min stora gamla bryggbänk och min rullande bänk som är tänkt till tvättmaskiner. En 60l-hink kommer inte in under kranen med Roller Base men jag använder extern pump och plattvärmeväxlare så för min del spelar det ingen roll. Jag är däremot nöjd med att kunna arbeta med maltröret och inmäskningen något lägre än tidigare.

Dropp från kranen efter pH-mätning eller pre boil gravity slipper hamna på bryggbänken.

 

Du har väl inte missat min bok om ölbryggning? Köp den hos Humlegården!



Annons:
swish-e1439054456319 Gillar du Lindh Craft Beer? Vill du hjälpa till att hålla site:en vid liv och se fler inlägg?
Då kan du skicka en donation via Swish på Swishnummer 0700 827038.
Pengarna går oavkortat till brygg- och bloggrelaterade utgifter och inget bidrag är för stort eller för litet. Tack!

Helles (H16)

Jag försöker ständigt förbättra men även förenkla mina bryggdagar så jag kan fokusera på de svåraste och viktigaste bitarna. Självklart försöker jag alltså förbättra de svåraste och viktigaste bitarna först men senaste tiden har jag lagt lite mer fokus på att få bort småstöriga hinder, dålig utrustning eller tråkiga moment. Först ut är att ge mig på min fjärde maltvåg i min hembryggarkarriär. Jag började som alla andra med en enkel köksvåg som fungerade bra upp till 5 kg men eftersom det var kökets våg fick jag springa fram och tillbaka med den varje gång. Ganska snabbt skalade jag upp till 40-60l-kok och behövde därför en våg som närmade sig mina 10-15 kg malt istället. Det visade sig vara lite svårare att hitta till vettig peng men efter ett tag hittade jag denna för det löjligt låga priset 80kr inkl frakt (detta var före Kina-tullarna).
Kinavågen klarar 10 kg vilket räckte gott men problemet var att den inte vägde korrekt när mätbehållaren (jäshink eller plåthink) ställdes på den. Det kunde skilja ett halvkilo beroende på hinkens placering så jag fick återgå till en stor rostfri IKEA-skål som har tillräckligt liten bas, men tyvärr rymmer den bara max 3 kg malt åt gången.
Sen fick jag idén om att ha en hängande bagagevåg som lätt skulle klara mina mängde och så kunde jag mäta upp maten i en hängande jäshink. Problemet med den vågen var att den efter bara några sekunder “låste värdet” precis som en digital badrumsvåg.
Som ni förstår har jag lagt alldeles för mycket energi på det här förhållandevis enkla problem så när jag hittade en ordentlig paketvåg på rea så slog jag till. Vågen av märket Steinberg (Tyskt och bra!) klarar upp till 40 kg med 1g noggrannhet och vågplattan är 25×25 cm, med andra ord perfekt till den jäshink jag brukar mala ner till i min krossstation. (scrolla ner lite). Jag tar alltså min jäshink från krossstationen, ställer på vågen, häller upp direkt från maltpåsen, dumpar all malt i den stora “hoppern” på min MM3-kross för att slutligen placera hinken tillbaka under krossen. Riktigt smidigt och riktigt bra men jag borde bara bitit ihop och köpt den direkt men jag var helt enkelt för snål för alla de dyra paketvågar jag googlat genom åren. De brukar nämligen kosta över tusenlappen medan denna vanligtvis ligger på 626kr inkl frakt. Med den korta rea som var låg den på 400kr och utan moms ännu lite billigare. Den drivs antingen på medföljande strömsladd eller batteri och enda negativa jag kan hitta med den är att sladden mellan vågen och displayen är lite för kort. I övrigt är jag riktigt nöjd och jag kortar ner maltvägningen från gissningsvis 10 minuter till 2 minuter.

Syramalten
På tal om att väga malt. Detta är mitt andra test av syramalt (vilket jag skrev om här) där jag första gången använde 2% och landade på pH 5,8. Förvisso med lite annat recept än denna bryggningen men jag ökade mängden till 5% av maltnotan som en gissning och ibland måste man ha lite tur också. Jag fick 5,3 i pH 20 minuter in i betaamylasrasten så mitt i prick! Smakmässigt har jag inte hunnit utvärdera min förra bryggning men jag tror att 2% syramalt är för lite för att göra en tydlig smakskillnad. Denna bryggning med 5% hoppas jag kan bli förnimbart men det vet vi först om en månad eller så.

Mittpinnen
Jag har fått en prototypdel till min Braumeister för att utvärdera om den kan ge högre utbyte. Jag har skrivit om den en massa gånger tidigare men det är egentligen bara ett stålrör med ca 8 hål i som ska fördela vörten genom maltbädden. Jag tyckte mig få något högre OG några gånger i början, sen märkte jag inte så stor skillnad. Denna gång testade jag utan och hamnade på typ samma OG (1.050). Jag ska testa att använda den igen några gånger innan jag kan dra någon slutsats nu när jag är inne i en period där jag använder exakt samma mängd vatten och malt och använder samma bryggmetod.

Mäskning och kok
Lite löjligt att sätta en rubrik till detta moment eftersom jag inte har något att rapportera mer än att det gick som förväntat, som vanligt, och utan några konstigheter. Över till kylningen…

Grainfather wortometer
Sedan jag gått från kylspiral till plattvärmeväxlare har jag saknat ett smidigt sätt att mäta temperaturen på den kylda vörten. Blichmann tillverkar en “Thrumometer” för ändamålet men problemet med den är att den inte klarar över 60°C. Jag desinficerar min pump och växlare genom att köra igenom kokande vatten i början på bryggdagen så därför var den aldrig aktuell för mig. Det finns även klumpiga och dyra termometrar att montera i bakändan på växlaren genom ett 1/2” T-rör men det gör rengöringen (eller framförallt torkningen) av växlaren efter bryggdagen avsevärt sämre om man inte har snabbkopplingar. Därför har jag skaffat min en “Wortometer” som är ett rostfritt rör med ett dykrör i där man kan stoppa i en termometer eller t.ex. Grainfathers egna insticksgivare. Jag har för stunden inte bestämt vilken termometer som ska få den äran utan så länge (i testfasen) får min grymma Gresinger GTH 1150 med GES 130 göra jobbet och det gjorde den galant. Den långa instickssensorn gav 0,1°C skillnad mot själva vätskan vilket är helt naturligt och t.om. långt över förväntan. Priset för Wortometern (199kr) är inget att bråka om tycker jag och enda minuset jag kunnat hitta är att det är för liten anslutning på nipplarna (9,5mm). Jag kör med 12×16-silikonslang och lyckades få det att täta ändå denna provomgång. I andra ändan testade jag att först ha en mindre slang (8×10) och sedan den vanliga ovanpå och det passade så bra att någon slangklämma inte behövdes! Jag monterade en för kort silikonslang efter Wortometern så jag fick pressa in vörten till jästanken underifrån vilket den kraftfulla Blichmann Riptide gjorde utan problem! På grund av det varma kranvattnet kom jag ner till 19°C som bäst så jag pitchade först 1/4-del av jästen mest för att förhindra oxidering. Fem timmar senare var vörten 10°C och jag tillsatte resterande jäst. Jäsningen var kraftig redan morgonen därpå så jag hoppas jag hinner hem från jobbresan till Holland innan det är dags för spundning!

Nya vågen som jag redan hunnit få maltdamm på.

Här med tom hink på och ”tarad” dvs. nollad.

Hällde direkt från påsen och ner i hinken. Ganska nöjd med endast två gram för mycket!

Svårt att fota svarta hål men där det lyser blått är hål för att kunna hänga skärmen på en vägg.

Smal referens någon?

Flytt av mäskvatten till temporär förvaring i kastrull. Även denna gången tryckte jag tillbaka vattnet med hjälp av Riptide-pumpen.

Referensbild på krossningen. Väldigt hela skal och kärnor i 3-4 bitar vilket är strålande. 4-5 hade varit optimalt men kan jävlas med bryggverkets recirkulering.

PH från enbart syramalten.

Wortometern (väldigt löjligt namn!) på plats.

Superfin whirlpool även denna gång. Kan nog säga med säkerhet att tekniken sitter nu. Kunde separera ut totalt två liter vört från detta sen vilket får anses vara ok på drygt 56 liters satsstorlek.

Här ser ni problemet med GES 130-instickssensorn. Den är i längsta laget och jag är rädd att böja den på längre sikt.

Vörten pumpas genom PVV:n och sen upp genom kranen på jästanken.


Recept

H16 – Lindhs Helles

Batchsize: 56.00 l
OG: 1.050 SG
FG: 1.007 SG
Alcohol by volume: 5.6 %
Bitterness: 21.9 IBUs
Color: 8.4 EBC

Water Prep

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
7.00 g Antioxin SBT (Mash 0.0 mins) Water Agent 1
6.00 g Calcium Chloride (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 2
2.00 g Salt (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 3
0.00 ml Lactic Acid (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 4

Mash Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
10800 g Barke Pilsner (Weyermann) (4.0 EBC) Grain 5 90.0 %
600 g Acidulated (Weyermann) (3.5 EBC) Grain 6 5.0 %
600 g Carahell (Weyermann) (25.6 EBC) Grain 7 5.0 %

Total amount of malt: 12000 g

Mash Steps

Name

Description

Step Temperature

Step Time
Mash in Add 70.57 l of water and heat to 62.0 C over 0 min 62.0 C 0 min
Beta-Amylase Heat to 63.0 C over 13 min 63.0 C 45 min
Alpha-Amylase Heat to 72.0 C over 11 min 72.0 C 30 min
Mash Out Heat to 76.0 C over 8 min 76.0 C 5 min

If steeping, remove grains, and prepare to boil wort

Boil Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
100 g Perle [6.00 %] – Boil 30.0 min Hop 8 21.9 IBUs
6.60 g Yeast Nutrient (Boil 10.0 mins) Other 9
1.80 g Protafloc (Boil 10.0 mins) Other 10
10.00 ml Lactic Acid (Boil 10.0 mins) Water Agent 11

Total amount of hops: 100 g

Fermentation Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
3.0 pkg Bavarian Lager [124 ml] Yeast 12

Recommended starter size: 7.25 l / 1036.2 Billion cells.

BrewNotes
Mitt kranvatten
Genomsnittliga värden 2018 (tidigare värde inom parentes)
25 Ca (29)
4,9 mg (2,49)
18 Na (8,8)
32 so4 (39)
14 cl (12)
80 Hco3 (61)

Mitt standardbryggvatten 190225
6g CaCl, 2g NaCl, 7g Antioxin för 45 PPM

50ppm Ca
5,9 Mg (1ppm från jästnäring)
29,3 Na
85 SO4 (32 från vatten, 39 från Antioxin och 14 från jästnäring)
73 Cl
-113,5 HCO3 (sen 80)
16,8 K
5,33 pH med 20,8ml Lactol (0,3 ml/l)

Bidrag från jästnäring på 2,2g/19l:

Calcium 0.696 ppb
Magnesium 0.928 ppm
Sulfate 13.920 ppm
Zinc 0.635 ppm
Manganese 0.567 ppm
Thiamine 0.241 ppm

Du har väl inte missat min bok om ölbryggning? Köp den hos Humlegården!



Annons:
swish-e1439054456319 Gillar du Lindh Craft Beer? Vill du hjälpa till att hålla site:en vid liv och se fler inlägg?
Då kan du skicka en donation via Swish på Swishnummer 0700 827038.
Pengarna går oavkortat till brygg- och bloggrelaterade utgifter och inget bidrag är för stort eller för litet. Tack!

Sommarölsträffen 2019

För femte året i rad har jag besökt Humlegårdens och SHBFs Sommarölsträff och jag börjar se ett mönster; det är alltid väldigt trevligt och det är alltid bra väder! Detta år valde jag att inte vara med och tävla utan endast komma som besökare. Dels för att det är krångligt att åka kommunalt med fat och tappkransanläggning, dels för att jag inte planerat någon öl som passar träffen och slutligen för att jag ligger efter med bryggandet och behöver ölet själv.
Jag samåkte med SHBFs ordförande och min gode vän Jonas Andersson och Mathias Brorson och tillsammans bryggde vi på Skansens julmarknad för en massa år sedan. Både Jonas och Mathias är både väldigt duktiga bryggare men även vana medaljvinnare i både Sommarölsträffen och andra tävlingar, t.ex. SM. Jonas valde att inte heller tävla i år men Mathias hade med sig två öl varav den ena (vilket jag sa direkt när jag jag smakade den) plockade hem guldmedaljen!

Nytt för i år var att även kategorin ”övriga drycker” gick att tävla i och till min glädje vann en Radler! Och vad är då en Radler undrar ni som inte varit så mycket i Tyskland. Jo det är oftast öl blandat med t.ex. sockerdricka och ölets ursprung sägs gå att härleda till en biergarten, Kugler Alm, beläget i Oberhaching vilket är ett naturskönt område strax söder om München. Året var 1922 och krögaren Franz Xaver Kugler serverade gladeligen litervis med öl till sina (ofta cykelburna) gäster. Just denna dag var det extra varmt och Franz märkte att ölen inte skulle räcka hela dagen om han inte gjorde något. Han spädde därför ut halva ölen med sockerdricka, vilket även halverade alkoholhalten, och döpte skapelsen till Radler vilket skulle löst kunna översättas till cykelöl eller ”Cyklare” (Rad=cykel). Historiker har på senare år funnit referenser till att denna benämning förekommit tidigare men jag väljer att tro på denna fina historia istället.

En helt ny dryck för mig var Tapache som är en dryck gjord på socker, ananas och ofta blandad med relativt lite öl av mexikansk ljus sort. Den smaksätts med citrus och har även ganska låg alkoholhalt. Väldigt frisk och god smak och skulle jag beskriva den så smakar den precis så som jag önskar att en Corona med lime borde smaka! Perfect till mexmat, snabb att göra (4-5 dagar) och kommer säkert stiga i popularitet här hemma framöver.

Med på träffen var även MiniBrew som är ett hel/halvautomatiskt bryggverk på endast 5-5,5 liter. Automatiseringen och guidningen genom bryggdagen gör denna maskin extra lämplig för nybörjare och förutom bryggverk är det även en temperaturstyrd kylanläggning och servering i samma kit! Till maskinen finns färdiga bryggkit för nybörjare medan den erfarna med lätthet komponerar sina egna. En bryggning ska enligt tillverkaren gå på 3-4 timmar och sköta sig sjjälvt för det mesta. Även rengöringen är självgående och jag hoppas kunna få möjlighet att berätta mer om denna spännande skapelse i framtiden.

Sommarölsträffen var som vanligt väldigt trevlig med riktigt god stämning, trevliga bryggare och god dryck. Grillarna gick på högvarv och öl med sol serverades i mängder. Tack till Humlegården och SHBF för denna sommarhöjdpunkt! Vi ses nästa år igen hoppas jag!

Reslutat i tävlingen

Sommaröl
Guld: Bröl Lemongrass Gose – Mathias Brorson
Silver: JUNZ-bocken – Jan Vallander, Ulf Mattäi, Niclas Fagerström och Zigge Jansson
Brons: RedPexx IPA – Ari Vallius

Övriga drycker
Oh My Gogh (Radler) – Elisabet Johansson, Johanna Koivunen, Lovisa Koivunen och Rebecca Finndell

Du har väl inte missat min bok om ölbryggning? Köp den hos Humlegården!



Annons:
swish-e1439054456319 Gillar du Lindh Craft Beer? Vill du hjälpa till att hålla site:en vid liv och se fler inlägg?
Då kan du skicka en donation via Swish på Swishnummer 0700 827038.
Pengarna går oavkortat till brygg- och bloggrelaterade utgifter och inget bidrag är för stort eller för litet. Tack!

Lindhs Pils (P16)

Min förra tyska pilsner (P15) är utan tvekan den bästa pils jag någonsin gjort så det finns ingen direkt anledning att ändra något i varken receptet eller procesen mer än för att stilla min nyfikenhet. De två saker jag ville testa denna gång var syramalt och att laka med hjälp av min Riptide-pump.

Syramalt är en pilsnermalt på 3-6 EBC som blivit sprayad med mjölksyra och den används istället för ren mjölksyra för att sänka pH:t i mäsken. Många av de som använder syramalt gör det för att inte ”använda tillsatser” i sina öl, dvs som ett sätt att sänka pH:t men fortfarande brygga enligt de tyska renhetslagarna Reinheitsgebot. En annan anledning är att syramalten är mycket enklare att dosera om man brygger mindre satser där någon ml mjölksyra för mycket eller för lite ger oönskade effekter. Men det är inte av de anledningarna som jag ville testa syramalt utan för att den mjölksyra som är sprayad på malten är uppodlad i en Sauergutreaktor. Sauergut är mjölksyravört framställd av de naturligt förekommande mjölksyrebakterier som finns på maltskalen och det går att göra en sån odling hemma med hjälp av några nävar okrossad malt och några liter vört. Problemet är bara att reaktorn/sauergut:en behöver ”jäsa” vid 48 C vilket jag inte orkar bygga en liten ugn till samt att kulturen ska hållas konstant syrefri vilket är knöligt när man ska skörda/fylla på ny vört. Corneliusfat är bästa förvaring men lite knöligt att fylla på mer vört. Istället kan man alltså köpa syramalt som har sauergut sprayat på sig. Jag smakade på några maltkorn från syramalten och kan bekräfta att den är rejält syrlig men har en frisk god smak som faktiskt går att hitta i en del tyska öl.

Mängden syramalt brukar räknas ut i procent där man tar 9-15 gram malt för varje 0,1 i pH man vill sänka per kilo malt. Spannet 9-15 är dock för stort för att man ska kunna räkna ut och få till ett bra resultat första gången man använder det och dessutom beror ju önskad pH-förändring på vilka maltsorter man använder för varje individuell bryggning. Jag testade med att byta ut 2% av pilsnermalten mot syramalt (upp till 10% är max vad som rekommenderas innan smaken slår igenom) denna gång och det visade sig vara alldeles för lite för denna ljusa pilsner och med mitt ändå förhållandevis mjuka vatten. PH i mäsken landade på 5,8 en kvart in i betaamylas-rasten så därför tillsatte jag mer mjölksyra i flytande form. Mängden mjölksyra lät jag Beersmith räkna ut och det gjorde programmet oerhört dåligt! Jag ville ner till 5,3-5,4 men hamnade på 5,1 istället. Ju mer jag använder Beersmith, ju sämre tycker jag att uträkningarna verkar stämma. FG och IBU är två parametrar som mer känns som gissningar än något annat. Jag har testat i princip alla andra bryggprogram som finns men inte känt mig tillräckligt imponerad för att byta då jag mest har programmet som förvaring av recept ändå.

Underlet vid inmäskning
Jag vill att hela maltröret ska vara täkt med vatten under mäskningen så jag kan ha ett flytande lock (en s.k. Mashcap). Det betyder att allt vatten inte kan vara i bryggverket när malten åker ner utan jag behöver fylla på vätska efter jag mäskat in. Jag förkokar allt mitt bryggvatten för att reducera syre så därför måste jag tillfälligt flytta ca 15 liter vatten från bryggverket till en kastrull, mäska in, och sen flytta tillbaka vattnet. Det låter krångligare än det är men jag försöker självklart ändå att förbättra och förenkla förfarandet. Denna gång testade jag att trycka tillbaka vattnet underifrån genom bottenkranen (draining valve) på Braumeistern med hjälp av min externa pump. Det gick smidigt även om jag borde haft lite större mängd vatten i den externa kastrullen för att minska risken att luft dras in på slutet. Hade jag haft en HLT på ca 100l hade jag kunnat förkoka allt vatten i den och med hjälp av pumpen och min plattvärmeväxlare, flytta allt vatten på en gång underifrån och i rätt temperatur i ett svep. Det tål att tänkas mer på…

Lakningen
Det var inte bara till inmäskningen som pumpen användes på (för mig) ett nytt sätt. Även vid lakningen fick den flytta 78-gradigt vatten men denna gång till toppen av det något upplyftta maltröret. ”Lyfta, laka, lyfta” var min tanke men det var väldigt svårt att försöka hålla en jämn nivå och att inte exponera malten för syre är bara att glömma. Vätskenivån sjunker undan så snabbt att fullt flöde på lakvattnet skulle behövas men jag tror ändå att det är omöjligt att få till metoden bra, och absolut inte varje gång, så jag släpper den bollen direkt. Det går med andra ord inte laka med Braumeistern om man brygger med lågsyremetoden LoDO och att laka när man inte brygger LoDO är hur enkelt som helst så jag sparar lakningen till de gångerna istället.

Nytt för dagen
Några små utrustningsnyheter i bryggeriet denna gång. Jag har köpt QD-snabbkopplingar även för vattnet till min Therminator plattvärmeväxlare för att inte slita på gängorna och för att det ska gå lite snabbare att komma igång med bryggdagen. Jag har även köpt några nya tredelade jäsrör till mina förkulturer eftersom de tredelade dels är lägre i höjd men framförallt enklare att hålla rena än de hederliga gamla s-formade.

Varmt vatten
Dagens andra ”Note to self” är att det för mig inte är smidigt att brygga lager i juli/augusti utan att det är bättre att brygga ale de veckorna istället. Kranvattnet höll nämligen 14 grader så att pitcha vid jästemp var bara att glömma denna gång. Jag ströp flödet så mycket mitt tålamod mäktade med men kom inte lägre ner än 16°c på vörten. Jag tycker inte om att vänta med att syresätta vörten och pitcha jästen vilket en del gör på sommarhalvåret, så därför fick det bli en 16c-pitch istället. Jag lät min förkultur stiga lite i temperatur innan jag hällde ner den i jästanken för att inte chocka jästen och jäsningen kom igång efter bara någon timme, trots att kylen sänkte vörtens temperatur under tiden. Jästen var med andra ord riktigt pigg och redo för pilsnertime…

Jag kan väga upp mellan 2,5-3 kg åt gången i min stora IKEA-skål vilket är den största behållaren som fungerat bra på min våg som klarar 10 kg. Jag har testat både en plåthink och jäshink men det blir inte jämn belastning och vågen visar fel mätvärde. Ny våg är beställd till nästa bryggning för nu ger jag upp med halvdana lösningar som fiskevågar eller köksvågar…

Min förkultur som egentligen är en jästkaka som jag matar och håller vid liv. Ca halva damejeannen är ren jäst och jag pitchar gladeligen dubbla mängden mot vad de flesta gör eftersom jag jäser så kallt, men över 2 liter jäst för 70 liter är för mycket t.om. för mig så jag sparade en del.

Här flyttas vatten från kastrullen till vänster och in i Braumeistern underifrån (kranen är på baksidan och syns inte i denna bild).

Min pH-mätare kämpar på. Jag tycker den är ganska bråkig vid kalibrering och sist tog det 30 minuter att få den bra kalibrerad och dessutom tar den ordentligt med tid på sig att ge ett stabilt värde. 1-2 minuter är inte en överdrift. Här är värdet med enbart syramalten.

Och här är värdet med en skvätt lactol (mjölksyra) tillsatt.

En hink med Saniclean där jag förvarar lite gott och blandat jag behöver senare på bryggdagen. Allt från silikonslangar till vattenlåt och kulkopplingar.

Proteinklägget till höger ger jag inte mycket för utan det skummar jag av.
-”Men det gör ju inga stora professionella bryggerier” kanske ni tänker.
-”Nej men de recirkulerar (vorlaufar) så pass mycket att de har renare vört i koket”…

Jag tyckte koket blev för intensivt i sommarvärmen så jag slet av isoleringen. Det är lite synd att gömma det fina bryggverket i en dykardräkt tycker jag även om jag upplever en jämnare mäsktemperatur med isoleringen på.

Plastkannan på plats så jag kan skumma av enkelt.

Flytt av vört vid plattvärmeväxlare till jästank. Jag kan ha tanken i jäskylskåpet direkt om jag vill men då är det svårt att syresätta med vispen. Kanske ska damma av min gamla vörtspridare igen? Det är ganska tungt att lyfta upp 57 kg stålrör och få in i kylen utan att använda handtagen.

Här än ett s.k. fast ferment test som ni kan läsa mer om här.

 

P16. Lindhs Pils (Tysk pilsner)
Batchsize: 68.00 l
OG: 1.046 SG
FG: 1.007 SG
Alcohol by volume: 5.1 %
Bitterness: 46.7 IBUs
Color: 6.5 EBC

Water Prep

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
21.67 ml Lactic Acid (Mash 30.0 mins) Water Agent 1
7.00 g Antioxin SBT (Mash 0.0 mins) Water Agent 2
6.00 g Calcium Chloride (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 3
2.00 g Salt (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 4

 

Mash Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
11442 g Barke Pilsner (Weyermann) (4.0 EBC) Grain 5 95.3 %
318 g Munich I (Weyermann) (14.0 EBC) Grain 6 2.6 %
240 g Acidulated (Weyermann) (3.5 EBC) Grain 7 2.0 %

Total amount of malt: 12000 g

Mash Steps

Name

Description

Step Temperature

Step Time
Mash in Add 83.07 l of water and heat to 62.0 C over 0 min 62.0 C 0 min
Beta-Amylase Heat to 63.0 C over 13 min 63.0 C 45 min
Alpha-Amylase Heat to 72.0 C over 11 min 72.0 C 30 min
Mash Out Heat to 76.0 C over 8 min 76.0 C 5 min

If steeping, remove grains, and prepare to boil wort

Boil Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
200 g Perle [5.00 %] – Boil 30.0 min Hop 8 30.9 IBUs

 

Steeped Hops

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
100 g Northern Brewer [7.00 %] – Steep/Whirlpool 20.0 min Hop 9 8.5 IBUs
100 g Perle [6.00 %] – Steep/Whirlpool 20.0 min Hop 10 7.3 IBUs

Total amount of hops: 400 g

Fermentation Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
3.0 pkg Bavarian Lager [124 ml] Yeast 11

Recommended starter size: 8.13 l / 1162.9 Billion cells.

BrewNotes
Mitt kranvatten
Genomsnittliga värden 2018 (tidigare värde inom parentes)
25 Ca (29)
4,9 mg (2,49)
18 Na (8,8)
32 so4 (39)
14 cl (12)
80 Hco3 (61)

Mitt standardbryggvatten 190225
6g CaCl, 2g NaCl, 7g Antioxin för 45 PPM

50ppm Ca
5,9 Mg (1ppm från jästnäring)
29,3 Na
85 SO4 (32 från vatten, 39 från Antioxin och 14 från jästnäring)
73 Cl
-113,5 HCO3 (sen 80)
16,8 K
5,33 pH med 20,8ml Lactol (0,3 ml/l)

Bidrag från jästnäring på 2,2g/19l:

Calcium 0.696 ppb
Magnesium 0.928 ppm
Sulfate 13.920 ppm
Zinc 0.635 ppm
Manganese 0.567 ppm
Thiamine 0.241 ppm

 

Du har väl inte missat min bok om ölbryggning? Köp den hos Humlegården!



Annons:
swish-e1439054456319 Gillar du Lindh Craft Beer? Vill du hjälpa till att hålla site:en vid liv och se fler inlägg?
Då kan du skicka en donation via Swish på Swishnummer 0700 827038.
Pengarna går oavkortat till brygg- och bloggrelaterade utgifter och inget bidrag är för stort eller för litet. Tack!

Helles 15

Söndagmorgon och det är mitt i semestern. Jag väcks 06.30 av den dova tonan av att Braumeistern tutar 85°C. Lite sömndrucken minns jag inte ip-numret för att via mobilen få tyst på ljudet för att sova en timme till så jag får gå till Braumeistern i det intilliggande bryggeriet istället, en tur som gör att jag vaknar tillräckligt för att bli kaffesugen. Låt bryggdagen börja medan resten av familjen sover!

Jag har installerat (nedgraderat till) föregående version av inbyggda programvaran till Braumeistern så den inte kopplar upp sig via internet utan istället styrs  direkt från lokala nätverket, eftersom jag har upplevt det som extremt segt att gå via MySpeidel. Kontrollern svarar först efter 3-4 sekunder per tryck och jag måste ange lösenord stup i kvarten Jag lyckas inte koppla upp mig via wifi-extendern som är i källaren och signalen till min basstation på övervåningen är något låg men jag tycker ändå att det borde fungera bättre än det gör. Jag har diskuterat problemet med Speidel men inte lyckats knäcka problemet så nu blev det en nedgradering istället. Nu med förra firmware:en och lokal uppkoppling går det återigen väldigt snabbt men det innebär å andra sidan att jag måste (klockan 06.30) minnas om det var 192.168.1.176 eller 192.168.1.179 den här gången. Jag tror att jag skulle klara av att sätta ett statiskt IP i Braumeistern men det får bli en senare fråga. Skönt är det iallafall att återigen kunna följa bryggningen från hela huset och tomten.

Misslyckad inmäskningen
Som jag berättat om tidigare förkokar och kyler allt mitt bryggvatten före inmäskning för att reducera syre men mängden vatten jag behöver för att senare ha en vätskenivå ovanför maltröret kan inte vara kvar i bryggverket vid inmäskning, utan måste temporärt flyttas till en kastrull för att sen återföras tillbaka till Braumeistern. Inte helt optimalt men det är min metod för stunden för att slippa koka och kyla på två ställen. Just nu när jag fortfarande labbar med bästa sättet att ha plattvärmeväxlaren och pumpen så är det lite si och så med mina olika längder på de silikonslangar jag behöver och just när jag skulle temporärt flytta vatten inför inmäskningen så fanns bara en kort slang att tillgå och i denna självpåtagna idiotsituation (eftersom jag har fler och längre slangar) tömmer jag ut lite för lite vatten. När jag sen sänker ner maltröret med hjälp av min vinsch så är alltså vattennivån för hög och jag har ingen hand ledig. Det hela slutar i att en massa malt rymmer från ovansidan av maltröret och ut i det övriga mäskvattnet. Någon minut med hålslev senare var 95% av alla skal uppfiskade men jag antar att denna sats inte blir riktigt så syrebefriad som jag skulle vilja. Som om det inte vore nog så glömde jag ha i mjölksyran innan malten åkte i, trots att flaskan stod på bänken bredvid salterna som jag fick i. Problemet med att inte ha i mjölksyran från början är att jag tycker mig märkt att den inte blandar sig så bra och jag får därför ett ojämnt pH i mäsken med lite lägre utbyte till följd. Om det var det som gjorde att jag hamnade 2°Ö lågt denna gång eller att jag kokade några minuter mindre är oklart men jag ser inga andra möjliga orsaker.

Bort med värmeväxlaren och pumpen
Jag har monterat bort både plattvärmeväxlaren och pumpen från sina tidigare positioner nere på bryggbänken för jag tyckte det blev så slaskigt sist. Istället, när jag monterade ner de, märkte jag att hålen på bägge mackapärer är identiska och vips så satt de bägge ihop som en enhet, väldigt smutt! Detta i kombination med att jag placerade hela klumpen på ett galler ovanför en plastlåda minimerade blask iallafall från kylningen (det går alldeles utmärkt att fortsätta söla ner på golvet med hålslåev, kondens från lock eller varför inte spilla lite kaffe?). De silikonslangar jag använder till pumpen och växlaren är de vanliga 12×16-slangarna som Humlegården säljer. De håller hur länge som helst (jag har kvar min första!) och de är smidiga att ha att göra med eftersom de är kokningsbara. Nackdelen är att de är lite för sladdriga, framförallt när de blir varma, så i min setup just nu viker sig gärna slangen vid inloppet till pumpen om den inte är i precis perfekt position dvs. att jag står och håller i den. Ganska så störigt med andra ord och något jag funderar på hur jag ska förbättra. Det finns förstärkt silikonslang numera har jag sett men inget jag fått möjlighet att pröva ännu. Någon annan som har hittat en lösning på slappa slangar?

När det blev dags för att kyla, efter min whirlpool med tillhörande 15-20 minuters vila, blev jag lite full-i-faan och kopplade slangen på den nedre “rengöringskranen” vid botten som endast finns på Braumeisters Plus-modeller. Jag installerade en liknande variant på min förra Braumeister och kallade projektet för Drainingvalve men det är en helt annan (och blodigare) historia som går att läsa om bakåt på bloggen. Jag fick till en så pass fin whirlpool denna gång att jag inte ens initialt fick något skräp i slangen och kunde således pumpa ut all vört till jäshinken. Nu hade jag förvisso endast 100 gram humle i koket så jag skulle inte testa detta med en IPA men för en mindre humlad vört, varför inte?

Lite data
7 – Antalet minuter det tog från kokande mäskvatten ner till 62°C.
14 – Grader Celcius jag max fick ner vörten till med rimligt flöde efter kok på grund av varmare kranvatten sommartid.
50 – Mängden varmvatten jag samlade i en stor hink för att använda till diverse akvariebestyr och tomatodling.
60,3 – Preboil Volume i liter. Ca 55l blev det efter kok.
163 – Antalet sekunder det tog att krossa 12000 gram malt vilket ger mig 73,6 gram per sekund.
1.050 – OG
1325 – Helt färdig med bryggdagen inklusive disk. Ja strax före klockan halv två alltså.

Inte så snyggt men det är en ”work in progress”. Basplattan på pumpen är fastskruvad i metallvinkeln till kylaren. När den ska tas isär släpper jag bara på de två stora muttrarna vid kylaren. Inga verktyg behövs.

Besvikelsen på inmäskningen.

När allt vatten var på plats såg det ändå helt okej ut men jag misstänker att jag gick högt på DO:n.

Fin vört efter mäskningen men lite mycket skum tyvärr.

Så enkelt men så smidigt. Jag har skrivit ner doseringen av Protafloc och jästsalter på locket för att slippa kolla i datorn. Små, små steg framåt för en enklare bryggdag.

Här syns tydligt hur pumpen är monterad på kylaren. Fyra skruvar med muttrar och några brickor var allt som krävdes.

Resultatet av dagens bryggning, syresatt, pitchad och redo för kylan.

Whirlpoolresultat 1/3

Whirlpoolresultat 2/3

Whirlpoolresultat 3/3. Det är det övre högra hålet som är ”ut” till pumpen och plattvärmeväxlaren.

Isärplockade delar på tork efter diskning.

Även Braumeistern får vila över natt uppochned för att torka i pumphusen.

Nu är jag vän med denna lilla rackare igen nu när jag har gamla programvaran.

 

H15 – Lindhs Helles (Helles)
Batchsize: 55.00 l
OG: 1.050 SG
FG: 1.007 SG
Alcohol by volume: 5.6 %
Bitterness: 22.3 IBUs
Color: 8.5 EBC

Water Prep

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
20.00 ml Lactic Acid (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 1
7.00 g Antioxin SBT (Mash 0.0 mins) Water Agent 2
6.00 g Calcium Chloride (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 3
2.00 g Salt (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 4

 

Mash Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
11400 g Barke Pilsner (Weyermann) (4.0 EBC) Grain 5 95.0 %
600 g Carahell (Weyermann) (25.6 EBC) Grain 6 5.0 %

Total amount of malt: 12000 g

Mash Steps

Name

Description

Step Temperature

Step Time
Mash in Add 69.53 l of water and heat to 62.0 C over 0 min 62.0 C 0 min
Beta-Amylase Heat to 63.0 C over 13 min 63.0 C 45 min
Alpha-Amylase Heat to 72.0 C over 11 min 72.0 C 30 min
Mash Out Heat to 76.0 C over 8 min 76.0 C 5 min

If steeping, remove grains, and prepare to boil wort

Boil Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
100 g Northern Brewer [6.00 %] – Boil 30.0 min Hop 7 22.3 IBUs
10.00 ml Lactic Acid (Boil 10.0 mins) Water Agent 8

Total amount of hops: 100 g

Fermentation Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
3.0 pkg Bavarian Lager [124 ml] Yeast 9

Recommended starter size: 7.12 l / 1019.0 Billion cells.

BrewNotes
Mitt kranvatten
Genomsnittliga värden 2018 (tidigare värde inom parentes)
25 Ca (29)
4,9 mg (2,49)
18 Na (8,8)
32 so4 (39)
14 cl (12)
80 Hco3 (61)

Mitt standardbryggvatten 190225
6g CaCl, 2g NaCl, 7g Antioxin för 45 PPM

50ppm Ca
5,9 Mg (1ppm från jästnäring)
29,3 Na
85 SO4 (32 från vatten, 39 från Antioxin och 14 från jästnäring)
73 Cl
-113,5 HCO3 (sen 80)
16,8 K
5,33 pH med 20,8ml Lactol (0,3 ml/l)

Bidrag från jästnäring på 2,2g/19l:

Calcium 0.696 ppb
Magnesium 0.928 ppm
Sulfate 13.920 ppm
Zinc 0.635 ppm
Manganese 0.567 ppm
Thiamine 0.241 ppm

 

Du har väl inte missat min bok om ölbryggning? Köp den hos Humlegården!



Annons:
swish-e1439054456319 Gillar du Lindh Craft Beer? Vill du hjälpa till att hålla site:en vid liv och se fler inlägg?
Då kan du skicka en donation via Swish på Swishnummer 0700 827038.
Pengarna går oavkortat till brygg- och bloggrelaterade utgifter och inget bidrag är för stort eller för litet. Tack!

Weißbier (W30)

Äntligen har semestern börjat och i år har vi inga större renoveringar eller altanbyggen inplanerade så min förhoppning är att jag ska hinna brygga ikapp lite. Först ut är en Weißbier för att snabbt få något drickbart i kegeratorn. Jag föredrar att ha veteöl på flaska men tyvärr hade jag svårt att klämma in en flaskning just när det skulle behövas. Eftersom jag spundar (kolsyrejäser med kvarvarande extrakt) och en veteöl jäser så pass fort, blir det en väldigt snäv tidslucka när detta måste ske. Jag bryggde denna öl i söndags och jästen åkte i vörten runt tretiden. Redan på kvällen var jäsningen i full gång och när jag på tisdagen mätte SG på eftermiddagen låg den på 1.016 vilket gjorde att jag ställde timer på fyra timmar och sen flyttade till fat. Jag räknar med att denna öl jäser ner till 1.010-1.009 baserat på många tidigare bryggningar. Något fast ferment test ger inte så mycket för denna snabba jäst då de jäser ut mer eller mindre samtidigt. För att få en kraftig kolsyra på ca 3 volymer så siktar jag på 4-5 °Ö jäsning i fatet. Jag har spundat på flaska några gånger och det har fungerat väldigt bra men det är väldigt farligt (flaskbomber) om man inte vet exakt hur mycket det kommer jäsa ut och om man har för tunna flaskor. Jag avråder därför starkt för flaskspundning och tycker man ska jäsa ut helt och flaskjäsa med speise (vört) eller socker istället vilket är mycket mer kontrollerad metod. På fat behöver jag heller inte oroa mig för lite överkolsyrning. Det kan ge väldigt mycket skum i början men det brukar ge med sig ganska snabbt när det bara handlar om en rimlig mängd. Skulle jag få för lite kolsyra är även detta väldigt enkelt ordnat. Själva kolsyrejäsningen på fat tar 1-2 dagar med så pigg jäst som jag använt samt att jästen aktiveras lite extra av flytten till fat. Jag kommer låtar faten stå i jästemperatur 20°C i någon dag extra för säkerhets skull eftersom jag absolut inte vill ha någon restsötma kvar vilket hänt vid något enstaka tillfälle. Sammantaget gör detta att jag har en veteöl i glaset på endast fem dagar, utan att tvångskolsyra eller skaka i någon kolsyra. Så nog kan det bli en Weißbier till sillen men även om veteöl ska drickas så färsk som möjligt så vet jag att den kommer bli bättre efter att ha stått kallt en vecka. Snabblagring eller bara andhämtning med andra ord.

Bryggningen
Bryggdagen flöt på smidigt även om jag började lite senare än jag brukar på grund av semestertider. Jag fick även denna gång till en väldigt bra whirlpool och konen blev så stabil att jag kunde tilta bryggverket 45 grader för att få ut sista vörten! Kvar blev max en halvliter vört eftersom jag inte ville riskera att få en stor klump med druv ner i plattvärmeväxlaren. Jag vevade med min stora slev i uppskattningsvis 15 sekunder och lät vörten snurra färdigt i exakt tio minuter innan jag öppnade kranen för att flytta vörten via pumpen och plattvärmeväxlaren till jäshinken. Även om kranvattnet är varmare nu på sommaren så kunde jag med enkelhet kyla vörten till 18°C nästan i full fart med Riptidepumpen, vilken ger ett riktigt kraftigt flöde. Det går alltså snabbare att kyla vörten till 18°C och få den ner i jäshinken än vad det skulle ta att bara öppna kranen på Braumeister och tömma den, detta eftersom pumpen mer eller mindre suger ut vörten ur kranen. Rengöringen av pump och PVV är enkel eftersom jag ändå har PBW i bryggverket efter bryggningen. Allt får pumpas runt en halvtimme-timme för att sen sköljas med vatten. Det som däremot ger merjobb är att byta riktning på flödet för att backspola PVVn. Det blir väldigt blaskigt på golvet och jag måste skaffa mig någon smidig men stor bricka för detta ändamål. Jag lyckades även dra igång pumpen utan att ha öppnat mottagande kran på bryggveket vilket fick till följd att slangen lossnade och en massa PBW flödade ut på golvet. Jag har alltid en mopp i närheten när jag brygger och denna gång kom den verkligen till användning. Monteringen av pump och PVV på bryggbänken blev snyggt och jag gillar att jag slipper ha de lösa på golvet under bryggningen men jag är nog inte helt i hamn ännu.

Ett plastlock från en låda fick agera spillbricka men det fungerade sisådär.

Tidigare har jag alltid köpt vete på 25kg-säck eftersom det blir billigare men jag brygger den för sällan för att det ska vara optimalt. Därför köper jag numera exakt den mängd jag ska ha inför varje bryggning. Likaså med jästen eftersom jag inte orkar ha mer än en ”husjäst” som jag håller igång.

Grumligare vört på grund av proteinrast och til viss del vete.

Ett smackpack och 2 liter förkultur till 52 liter vört skulle vara en underpitch om det inte vore för att det var just en veteöl som ska jäsas och den mindre mängde jäst främjar bildandet av isoamylacetat (bananester).

Lite lakning till framtida förkulturer och sen det underbara momentet ”dravhantering”. Jag har börjat skänka mitt drav till hönsägare i trakten så nu slipper det lukta i soptunnan en vecka.

Jag har slutat använda packningen till huvan på sistone och visst glider locket lite lättare men i övrigt fungerar det lika bra tycker jag.

 

W30 – Weißbier (Ljus veteöl av sydtysk typ)
Batchsize: 54.00 l
OG: 1.052 SG
FG: 1.008 SG
Alcohol by volume: 5.9 %
Bitterness: 13.4 IBUs
Color: 8.6 EBC

Water Prep

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
20.00 ml Lactic Acid (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 1
7.00 g Antioxin SBT (Mash 0.0 mins) Water Agent 2
6.00 g Calcium Chloride (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 3
2.00 g Salt (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 4

 

Mash Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
6000 g Wheat Malt, Pale (Weyermann) (3.9 EBC) Grain 5 50.0 %
5400 g Barke Pilsner (Weyermann) (4.0 EBC) Grain 6 45.0 %
600 g Carahell (Weyermann) (25.6 EBC) Grain 7 5.0 %

Total amount of malt: 12000 g

Mash Steps

Name

Description

Step Temperature

Step Time
Mash in Add 66.59 l of water and heat to 44.0 C over 0 min 44.0 C 0 min
Ferulic acid rest Heat to 44.0 C over 4 min 44.0 C 20 min
Beta-Amylase Heat to 63.0 C over 13 min 63.0 C 45 min
Alpha-Amylase Heat to 72.0 C over 11 min 72.0 C 30 min
Mash Out Heat to 76.0 C over 8 min 76.0 C 5 min

If steeping, remove grains, and prepare to boil wort

Boil Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
35 g Perle [8.00 %] – Boil 60.0 min Hop 8 13.4 IBUs
10.00 ml Lactic Acid (Boil 10.0 mins) Water Agent 9

Total amount of hops: 35 g

Fermentation Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
1.0 pkg Weihenstephan Weizen (Wyeast Labs #3068) [124 ml] Yeast 10

Recommended starter size: 10.20 l / 696.4 Billion cells.

BrewNotes
Mitt kranvatten
Genomsnittliga värden 2018 (tidigare värde inom parentes)
25 Ca (29)
4,9 mg (2,49)
18 Na (8,8)
32 so4 (39)
14 cl (12)
80 Hco3 (61)

Mitt standardbryggvatten 190225
6g CaCl, 2g NaCl, 7g Antioxin för 45 PPM

50ppm Ca
5,9 Mg (1ppm från jästnäring)
29,3 Na
85 SO4 (32 från vatten, 39 från Antioxin och 14 från jästnäring)
73 Cl
-113,5 HCO3 (sen 80)
16,8 K
5,33 pH med 20,8ml Lactol (0,3 ml/l)

Bidrag från jästnäring på 2,2g/19l:

Calcium 0.696 ppb
Magnesium 0.928 ppm
Sulfate 13.920 ppm
Zinc 0.635 ppm
Manganese 0.567 ppm
Thiamine 0.241 ppm

 

Du har väl inte missat min bok om ölbryggning? Köp den hos Humlegården!



Annons:
swish-e1439054456319 Gillar du Lindh Craft Beer? Vill du hjälpa till att hålla site:en vid liv och se fler inlägg?
Då kan du skicka en donation via Swish på Swishnummer 0700 827038.
Pengarna går oavkortat till brygg- och bloggrelaterade utgifter och inget bidrag är för stort eller för litet. Tack!

Lindhs Pils P15

Jag får ofta höra meningen “hur hinner du brygga så ofta” vilket jag tycker är konstigt. De senaste åren har jag snittat 14-16 bryggningar per år vilket brukar innebära ungefär en bryggning per månad med några enstaka extrabryggningar emellanåt pga. SM eller att jag har långledigt. Den här pilsnerbryggningen jag ska berätta för er om i detta inlägg är t.ex. mitt första kok sedan 15:e mars, dvs åtta veckor sen, vilket är långt mer sällan än jag skulle önska. I min drömvärld skulle jag brygga minst varannan vecka men den tiden finns helt enkelt inte att uppbringa. Därför känns det ibland lite skevt när jag inser att bloggen tar en massa dyrbar tid och energi som jag istället kunde lagt på att brygga öl. Samtidigt har bloggen tvingat och hjälpt mig utvecklas som bryggare genom att få mig att analysera och dissekera varenda bryggning i detalj. Jag har med andra ord insett att det inte är antalet bryggningar per år som tar mig framåt som bryggare utan hur väl jag tänker efter och försöker förbättra min bryggning. Man kan tycka att listan över utrustning, metoder och råvaror att experimentera med borde sinat vid det här laget men det är snarare tvärt om; jag har massor kvar att utforska!
Senaste tiden har vi det som familj haft det väldigt kämpigt vilket har gått ut extra mycket över både bryggning och bloggen så om ni tycker aktiviteten varit på sparlåga ett tag så är det helt korrekt. Jag hoppas på en ljusning under semestern…

Ringrostig
De olika momenten under bryggdagen borde verkligen sitta i ryggmärgen vid det här laget men åtta veckor (förvisso med tveksam sömn) var tydligen tillräckligt för att tappa flow och jag fick tänka efter flera gånger hur mitt senaste och bästa “modus operandi” var. Jag har, vilket ni säkert redan listat ut, dokumenterat min process in i minsta detalj även om jag aldrig konsulterar den texten under själva bryggdagen. Jag har under senaste tiden tänkt allt mer på standardisering och hur jag kan strömlinjeforma allt från process till råvaror och recept för att få bättre öl, bättre repetitiva resultat och enklare bryggdagar. Steg nr.1 var att bestämma och framöver alltid använda samma mängd vatten. Steg nr.2 var att minska inventarierna för att sedan helt gå över till att planera och beställa råvaror för mina kommande 2-3 bryggningar. Exakt vad det ska mynna ut i vet jag inte men jag tror starkt på Dieter Rams mantra ”weniger aber besser” (mindre, men bättre) och att åtminstone bryggdagen ska bli bättre.

Plattvärmeväxlare
Sedan förra bryggningen har jag monterat både nya pumpen och plattvärmeväxlaren på min bryggbänk. Tyvärr kan inte plattvärmeväxlaren vara ständigt monterad eftersom den ska förvaras i annan position än den används för att allt vatten ska rinna ut men att ha en fast plats under bryggdagen är ändå årstider bättre än att ha allt löst på golvet. Jämfört med senaste bryggningen åtta veckor sedan har klimatet blivit betydligt mer somrigt vilket innebär varmare vatten i kranen men det påverkade inte min bryggdag alls. Med fortfarande riktigt högt flöde (kolla denna instagramvideo) fick jag ut vörten på 13°C vilket gjorde att jag var lagertempspitchad och redo för disk endast 10 minuter efter en whirlpoolstand på 10 minuter efter flameout! Som ni läste om i mitt senaste test fick jag samma kylresultat med plattvärmeväxlaren som med min kylspiral när de bägge användes för att kyla hela satsen på en gång men att använda plattvärmeväxlaren som den är tänkt, dvs som “one-pass”, drar av minst en timme på min bryggdag och kanske t.om. två timmar sommartid då jag drar ner på flödet från kranen eller kör någon form av pump och recirkulering av kylvatten. Anledningen till att det tar extra lång tid att kyla med kylspiralen är även att jag efter avslutad kylning där pumparna stått igång måste göra en sedimenteringspaus för att låta all humle och druv sjunka till botten. Numera med plattvärmeväxlaren gör jag en whirlpool, dvs snurrar vörten med hjälp av en stor sked, precis efter jag stängt av värmen och redan efter 10 minuter är vörten sedimenterad och redo att lämna bryggverket. Exakt varför det går mycket snabbare och bättre för min del med varm vört kan jag inte svara på i dagsläget men det har inte med mängden humle att göra för detta kok rymde 400 gram pellets…
Det som behöver förbättras med min kylning är någon form av uppsamlingsfat för det blir blaskigt på golvet när det är dags för rengöring och riktningen på flödet ska bytas, dvs två slangar ska byta plats. De silikonslangar jag använder mellan alla delar är lite för slappa så de vill gärna vika sig och slutligen är temperaturövervakningen väldigt manuell och behöver integreras. Jag har nu stoppat in min desinficerade temperaturgivare under flödet ner i jästanken för att sedan med andra handen justera flödet på pumpen tills rätt temperatur uppnåtts men jag tänker mig en inlinetermometer på slangen istället och där finns tre varianter att välja på: Blichmanns Thrumometer som tyvärr inte klarar att utsättas för mer än 60°C, Inline-termometer QD som bara är en 1/2” t-korsning med en kött-termometer i och slutligen Grainfathers “Wortometer” som fungerar snarlikt men med dykrör för en sensor eller extern temperaturgivare. Vilken av dessa tre jag landar på vet jag inte riktigt i dagsläget.

Bryggdagen
Bryggningen passerade utan några konstigheter eller avvikelser förutom blaskigt golv (äsch, torrt golv hade varit en avvikelse i ärlighetens namn) och det var jäsaktivitet redan samma kväll trots den initiala kylningen från 13°C till 7°C. Tanken är att ölet ska vara färdiglagrat om fyra veckor när semestern börjar men det är kanske lite optimistiskt även om jag lyckats tidigare på den tiden. Kan vara så att första fatet får bli mer av en kellerbier med ett lite ofiltrerat utseende och fat nummer två uppnår kristallstatus. Det märks framåt sommaren…

Jag hade inte rätt dimension på skruvar hemma så det fick bli en quickfix med brickor istället. Det räckte med att ha två skruvar upptill även om det finns fyra färdiga hål i basplattan till pumpen.

Flaggan från SM hänger kvar på väggen tillsammans med tre stenhårda, intorkade brezel. Ordningen ska snart återställas…

Jag ligger fortfarande på 0,8mm i krossstorlek i min Monster Mill MM3 som är trevalsad. Den klassiska borrmaskinen fungerar fortfarande kanon liksom hela dammfria krossstationen.

Som ni ser är skalen väldigt hela och fina tack vare första valsparet som öppnar kärnorna på 1,6mm. Jag skulle säkert kunna dra ner på tredje valsen till 0,6mm för att gå från 3-4 kärnbitar till 5-6 men jag avvaktar lite med det. Mitt utbyte är stabilt och jag är utan några vörtfontäner eller igensatta lakningar (inte för att jag lakar men ändå).

Liten men dock för mig viktig förbättring är att hänga plastkannan på sidan av bryggverket. Den är främst till för när jag ska skumma av ytan precis vid uppkok men ger en naturlig avlastningspunkt för sleven. Småtöntigt ja men det är så jag jobbar…

Dokumentation av vätskenivå efter inmäskning.

Jag råkade kyla inmäskningsvattnet lite för mycket men hellre det än att mäska in för varmt vilket kan stressa enzymet betaamylas.

Jag saknar bra plats för slangar under själva bryggningen.

Jag ligger riktigt ur fas inför sommaren och nästan alla fat är tomma. Min fattvätt fungerar dock fortfarande mycket bra och alla fat är rengjorda och desinficerade, redo för nya bryggder!

Mittpinnen som är en prototyp från Speidel används fortfarande och jag tycker den fungerar bra med ett bra utbyte.

Detta är min version av lakning för att inte få ner syre i min ”huvudsats” i bryggverket. Vörten jag samlar på detta sätt åker antingen ner i frysen för att bli förkulturer framöver eller så får den sig ett litet humlekok och alejäst för att bli gräsklipparöl. Med andra ord ingen öl jag talar högt om i finsmakarkretsar men för min del att ha lite välhumlad folkbärs stående i ett fat är aldrig fel…

Kylning vid pump och PVV rätt ner i kyltanken.

View this post on Instagram

With this flow I got 13c wort straight in the fermenter! The Blicmann Riptide and Therminator has really improved my brewday a whooole lot. I just whirlpool on flame out, let it sit for 10 minutes and then transfer @13c to fermenter in less than 10 minutes. Yeast goes in as soon as I’ve confirmed wort temp. The fermentation started within 3 hours on beer I call Lindh Pils (recipe in my book). . . . #homebrew #homebrewing #homebrewer #brewing #beerbrewing #beerporn #brewporn #beer #ölbryggning #craftbeer #hembryggning #öl #braumeister #speidelsbraumeister #ekolager #lodo #lowdissolvedoxygen #homebrewingonly #dohomebrew #homebrew_feature #brewstagram #homebrewingexperience @blichmannengineering @ekolager

A post shared by Gustav Lindh (@lindhcraftbeer) on

Whirlpool-konen precis innan den börjar vidga sig och bli större på toppen.

Jag hinner få ut all vört som står i högt med kranen innan humlen når dit. Som ni ser är det relativt mycket humle som samlats i en fin whirlpoolkon och genomskinligheten på vörten vid sidan av är det inget fel på tycker jag.

En sparad och matad jästkaka precis innan det är dags för pitch och jäsning på 7°C. Prost!

Lindhs Pils

Batchsize: 55.00 l
OG: 1.053 SG
FG: 1.008 SG
Alcohol by volume: 5.9 %
Bitterness: 54.2 IBUs
Color: 8.0 EBC

Water Prep

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
20.00 ml Lactic Acid (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 1
7.00 g Antioxin SBT (Mash 0.0 mins) Water Agent 2
6.00 g Calcium Chloride (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 3
2.00 g Salt (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 4

Mash Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
11160 g Barke Pilsner (Weyermann) (4.0 EBC) Grain 5 93.0 %
840 g Munich I (Weyermann) (14.0 EBC) Grain 6 7.0 %

Total amount of malt: 12000 g

Mash Steps

Name

Description

Step Temperature

Step Time
Mash in Add 69.53 l of water and heat to 62.0 C over 0 min 62.0 C 0 min
Beta-Amylase Heat to 63.0 C over 13 min 63.0 C 45 min
Alpha-Amylase Heat to 72.0 C over 11 min 72.0 C 30 min
Mash Out Heat to 76.0 C over 8 min 76.0 C 5 min

If steeping, remove grains, and prepare to boil wort

Boil Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
100 g Northern Brewer [7.00 %] – Boil 30.0 min Hop 7 25.4 IBUs
100 g Hallertauer Mittelfrueh [3.80 %] – Boil 10.0 min Hop 8 6.5 IBUs
100 g Northern Brewer [7.00 %] – Boil 10.0 min Hop 9 12.0 IBUs
100 g Perle [6.00 %] – Boil 10.0 min Hop 10 10.3 IBUs
10.00 ml Lactic Acid (Boil 10.0 mins) Water Agent 11

Total amount of hops: 400 g

Fermentation Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
3.0 pkg Bavarian Lager Yeast 12

Recommended starter size: 7.53 l / 1076.1 Billion cells.

Du har väl inte missat min bok om ölbryggning? Köp den hos Humlegården!



Annons:
swish-e1439054456319 Gillar du Lindh Craft Beer? Vill du hjälpa till att hålla site:en vid liv och se fler inlägg?
Då kan du skicka en donation via Swish på Swishnummer 0700 827038.
Pengarna går oavkortat till brygg- och bloggrelaterade utgifter och inget bidrag är för stort eller för litet. Tack!