Posts in Category: Bryggning

Hefeweizen brewday (28)

This brewsession actually started a few days in advance. First I took some time to remove all brewing gear that I don’t use during a normal brewday any more, clean out the clutter. Less is more and it’s a lot easier to keep everything clean and tidy when there’s less stuff everywhere (not that I have a very messy brewery but still). I also removed everything that I kept under my sink. It’s not a place for storage nor for cleaning equipment, it’s a work bench and not a shelf. In my ideal brewery, newly cleaned (and also still wet) equipment can dry in their dedicated storage space so I don’t need to move everything twice. I’m slowly getting there by adding more hooks one the wall and a place to hang hoses. I also made a temporary installation of a water hose in the cieling for the cooling mantle and immersion chiller so I don’t have to install/connect one twice per brewday and have it on top of my workbench. This might seem a bit silly but all these small improvements makes for an easier brewday with less boring tasks. Two days before the brewday I made a starter of about 1,5l with Weihenstephan W68 (WY3068) yeast. When talking directly to a guy with deep knowledge of Weihenstephans brew methods he advised against underpitching hefeweizen in a homebrew environment but I know what a massive kreusen the W68 can create so I didn’t dare to make a bigger one. Less yeast means more esters (mmm that banana isoamylacetate) but it can give you problems like sulfur and low attenuation. With hefe starters, let’s just say I do slight an underpitch and still sleep well at night. I have also made the decision to always (from now on) buy this yeast fresh for every brew. I’ve tried so many times to harvest the yeast by skimming the kreusen but I don’t get predictable results from it and I actually stalled one fermentation once. To keep a healthy culture going you need to brew with it often or keep feeding it and I only have the energy to keep one big culture alive that way…

PH of a Weißbier
Hefeweizens benefit from a higher initial pH because the ferulic acid is more active over pH 5,7 than my usual pH range of 5,3-5,4 so I waited to add the lactic acid until the beginning of the beta amyalse rest. Having tried two bottles already I can tell you the clove and black pepper like nuances are very pronounced, almost too much! This might even out in a few weeks when the flavours mellow and come together more but right now I’m thinking of lowering that mash rest by 10 min. I know that Kai @Braukaiser did an opposite conclusion of the ferulic acid rest but his experiment might have been flawed by the stuck fermentation and very low primary fermentation temperature. I wish I could spend my whole days in a lab testing these things out for real but for now I have to rely on batch-to-batch testing and I’m too lazy to have a double brew setup to do side by side tests. I want to brew beer, not just experiment every time.

No photos and no haze
Those who have been following me for a while will notice that the photo documentation starts in the middle of the brew day this time. That’s because I didn’t have my camera available and also spent part of the morning with my daughter in her new kindergarten. Nothing new or particularly visual happened during the crush, preboil or mash in so we can skip right to the mash out. This being a weißbier/Hefeweizen my grain bill is always minimum 50% wheat (sometimes up to 60%). That amount of wheat combined with a protein rest at 55°C would give me hazy wort according to my latest experiments but it went the other way. The wort at mash out was crystal clear so blaming wheat for your hazy beer might not be totally accurate! 

My Braumeister decoction workaround method
Many of my favorite breweries still decoct their beers and while it is not at all recommended for low oxygen brewing, it is even more hard with the Braumeister when the malt pipe is over flown with water/wort. So I did a little thinking and came up with a solution. Most decoctions is taken early in the mash program and historically used to raise the temperature in a controlled way in times when they had no tools to measure temperature. Using one third of the thick mash, boiling it and then return it would always give a X amount of raised temperature since the boiling temperature is fairly constant. But on the way to the boil, many decocters (my own invented word; “Decocter”, a man who decocts) will first rest at beta/alfa-temperatures for starch to convert to sugar. That’s kind of the same thing as letting the mash go thru a full mash program and then boil it (but with less wort). So this is the method that I used; After I lifted the malt pipe and let it drain for 10 minutes, I transfered most of the spent grains to a new boil kettle with a lauter helix in it for my “Braumeister decoction workaround method”. I added a few liters of water for a “sparge”, hoping that the pH would still be within reasonable levels, and began boiling the thick mixture on low heat (1200 watts). I only stirred a few times during the 45 min boil but still there wasn’t any scorching. After the boil I recirculated the boiled wort for a while but it didn’t get much clearer to I gave up and collected the 4 litres and added it straight to the Braumeister that was boiling since half an hour. The hazy wort could have come from the boiling or the short malt bed that didn’t work properly as a filter, that I don’t know (and for a hefe I don’t really care either). Yes the amount of oxygen that got into the mash from transfer, stirring and boiling the decoction would destroy the LoDO-flavours of that part of the wort but I still had those flavours in the wort in the Braumeister. And since I boiled the decoction and transfered almost boiling decocted wort into an already boiling wort I don’t think I added enough oxygen to flaw the “main wort”. Anyhow, I did take a sample before and after the decoction to smell and taste what a 45 min boil would do and surprisingly there was only a small nuance difference. The decoct sample had a smoother and softer mouthfeel (kind of wheat flour-ish), some Munich malt flavours and sweeter. The non decoct sample had a more grainy, raw, green and fresher tone, almost a bit “watery” in comparison. They both had the same SG so no conversion took place in the kettle. The decocted sample was a little bit darker (see photos below).
My conclusion; I was surprised that there wasn’t a bigger difference in taste. I don’t see how this little amount of decocted wort would make a big or even noticeable difference to the main batch so even if the decoction was a success, I think I would have to “filter” my whole wort through the decocted mash to get more flavour out of it and that would not be possible with regards to low oxygen brewing. It was still a fun method to try out but I don’t think it was worth it and I will probably not explore this any further unless any of you guys out there try it and get different results than me.

Wheat = more cleaning?
Since I upgraded to the plus version of the Braumeister (new controller unit and cooling jacket) I have had a very easy time cleaning the insides and heat coils after a brew day but not this time. The coils have residues on them and the kettle inside need more action than my CIP ball can deliver with PBW. I’m not too fond of using NaOH for cleaning because of the danger of chemical burn on skin (and potential blindness) and it is also bad for the pumps but it gets the job done. My theory of what caused the extra junk was the wheat and/or protein rest.

The Braumeister boil
One new feature of the latest controller version for the Braumeister is the warning signal to remove the lid when the temperature is approaching 100°C. I just wish it could be louder so I can hear it from another room in the house or that it could send a warning to my phone via myspeidel.com or the wifi app interface. One other software related problem is that the count down of the latest firmware begins way later than I think the boil begins. This time I actually timed it and I had a good rolling boil nearly ten minutes before the 60 min countdown began. I’ve actually changed my boil time in the mash program to 50 min instead of 60 min because of this. Not a big deal but I can’t see the reason for it. The old controller began the count down a few minutes after passing the 98°C mark but this have obviously changed for some reason. 

Bottle spunding
After many batches of hefes I’ve realised that this is one beverage that really benefits from being in a bottle and not a keg. I’m not very fond of bottling and switching to keg was a huge timesaver for me. But for a hefeweizen, the keg will begin to pour a very haze beer and after a few weeks it will almost pour a kristallweizen. One could shake the keg every now and then but that will not give a controllable mount of yeast in the glass. That’s why I’ve started bottling my hefes and also started bottle spunding, which means that I will bottle the beer with remaining extract left to ferment. I have brewed hefeweizen so many times that I know what the final gravity will be approxemently which is a must since a fast ferment test will not work very well because of the similar temperatures. If you’re not careful, you might end up with bottle bombs so use this method only if you are VERY confident about your presumed final gravity and sanitation! I want a pretty high carbonation level of this beer style and I’m aiming for 3,5-4,0 volumes of CO2. Every SG point gives you roughly 0,51 vol CO2 and my FG is always between 1.010 to 1.012. That made me wait until my gravity reached 1.018 before transfering to bottles and I have sneaked a few samples already and they taste very nice. It might not beat a fresh Weihenstephan enjoyed in their beirgarten in Freising (been there three times) but it sure tastes better then the bottles I can buy here in Sweden. I love to travel, but beer doesn’t and it should always be enjoyed locally is my philosophy. 

The water hose for the chiller(s) is just twirled around some pipes for now but I might do a proper installation in the near future.

This clarity is unheard of in a wheat beer! The level of foam here is OK but not much more. I will keep on struggling for zero foam but I’m not willing to loose 3-4 SG points just yet.

Final draining and some light sparging of the malt pipe into my 36l kettle.

The beginning of the decoction.

The ”Remove lid function” that I really like but would prefer to have a louder volume of.

The countdown begins in 10, 9, 8… Minutes that is.

Doing the vorlauf (recirculing).

The before and after of the decoction. The left one is the before sample and the brightness difference you see here is about how much I saw with a naked eye. The sedimentation of the left sample is due to the 45m longer wait time before this photo was taken.

Yeast culture that have been standing on a stirr plate for two days.

The w68 makes a huge kreusen so I ended up splitting the batch into two buckets just in case…

 

(had to make the recipe a screenshot since it started messing with the sites width).

Du har väl inte missat min bok om ölbryggning? Köp den fraktfritt här eller hos Humlegården där jag får en slant per såld bok!
Annons:
swish-e1439054456319 Gillar du Lindh Craft Beer? Vill du hjälpa till att hålla site:en vid liv och se fler inlägg?
Då kan du skicka en donation via Swish på Swishnummer 0700 827038.
Pengarna går oavkortat till brygg- och bloggrelaterade utgifter och inget bidrag är för stort eller för litet. Tack!

Lindhs Pils (13)

I’m thought my long vacation would let me brew many times to fill up my empty kegs but I only got around to three brewdays and this being the third. I have a few beers planned that I want to try to brew but right now I need to fill up with pils and hefe so I have a decent supply for the autumn. The recipe this time is the same as the last but I have some Maris Otter that I won at the Swedish Homebrew Championship that I want to get rid of so a 40/60 blend with Balder pilsnermalt was the rather odd base malt blend this time. I want my basemalt to be around 4 EBC like Weyermanns Barke and a blend can contribute to a fuller spectrum of tastes. Since the last time I have adjusted my 3-roller mill from 0.8mm to 1.0mm to see if it affects my efficiency that I would like a bit higher and it sure did. With the exact same amount of malt (12.o kg) as last time I got 4 SG points more and that’s a decent improvement for such a simple adjustment. The higher efficiency comes from less channeling in the malt bed because a coarser crush should in fact give you lower efficiency and not the other way around.

LOB Kit
This was my first time with the final version of the low oxygen brewing kit from Speidel and I tried to brew without any gasket on the top disc since all the plates are resting above the maltpipe and not inside as the original design is intended to do. It worked very well with no malt particles or husks in the boil wort so I will brew without the gasket from now on. One bonus effect that I hadn’t thought about before is that since discs are fixed on top and not moving anymore so I will not get splashed in the face during the lifting of the maltpipe after the mash. I raise my pipe very slow to reduce oxygen intake, demote channeling and to avoid the ”suck back” when the maltpipe is just about to leave the liquid level. Somewhere in the middle of this 3-4 min process, the filters will float a bit above the malt bed (which is contracting when the liquid leaves) and it is being held in place by the gasket. But when everything cools down and shrinks, the filter will fall down and hit the surface and give me a reminder of what a foul language I can fill my brewery with, and how sticky wort in your face can be. That’s all in the past now and while it will not improve my beers, it will make for a little better brewday for sure…

LQ Saison
This being a LoDO brewsession (as 95% of my ”real” brews are), I did not sparge the main batch. ”Main batch”, as I did a second batch by sparging the malt pipe above a separate kettle, both to take care of some precious malt sugars but also to fill up akegs with easy drinking beer with less alcohol. It kind of bothers me a little that some of these side batches, parti gyles or spargebeers (call the what you like) turns out as good as they do. I have abused the hell out of them (in proper brewing technique terms) by boiling for just 5-10 minutes and sometimes done no chill or ”bad chill”. And still they have came out quite good and quaffable. This time I did a Saison or rather a pilsner, fermented with Saison yeast, since I had some I needed to use up. I did chill it by daisy chaining my cooling jacket on the Braumeister to my 29m monsterhuge SS chiller but the boil time was just ”a while” (I didn’t measured it). I even added some sugar to raise the OG to around 1.040-ish/10°P and since a Saison can handle it. I’m guessing this will be the last time you hear about this ”Low Quality Saison” but I wouldn’t be surprised if it turns out drinkable.

Back to the main batch
The German pilsner got an OG of 1.051 which is on the high side for the style but not by much. The only thing I did different from my usual pilsner brews was the late hops that I instead added at flameout together with my mash cap. Then I started a slow cooling to avoid too much bitterness from the hopstand and it took about 20 minutes before I was below isomerisation temps. Since I only used a 60m and flame out addition and not my usual hop schedule, I forgot to add my 10m lactic acid addition that I’ve been using for a while now. Even without that, I got a very nice hot- and cold break and I feel no need to start using protafloc again and the 10m lactic to lower the pH to the 5.0-5.2 is actually the only thing that makes me not beeing Reinheitsgebot. I’ve slowly removed all the ”extras” like gelatin, protafloc, yeast nutrients and foam reducers and I’ve found out I don’t really need them like before. Proper brewing techniques and quality control will make up for most of these additives (except maybe for zinc from the yeast nutrients) and even though following Reinheitsgebot will absolutely not make your beers better (and most of it has a bigger historic value than anything else), adding unnecessary things to your beers feels, you know, unnecessary. The RHG would never have survived without the ability to lower pH with workarounds like Sauergut or acid malt and most bigger breweries are working hard to come up with sneaky solutions like that. For instance, some breweries have installed a zinc pipe that the mash water goes thru to add zinc ”without adding it” which I feel is a bit silly.

It’s hard to see in this photo but there was a nice fog in the ceiling from preboiling the water without using my vent pipe (it’s under the table as you can see).

I got some moisture in the control panel this time as well and I’m not too fond of the combination of water and electronics. Hopefully the humidity will get lower as the autumn comes…

Look at this, I made it! I have no idea why it sometimes works and sometimes not but the feeling of opening a grain bag the right way is awesome.

Measuring salts.

The 1.0mm crush in a closeup.

Mash in after the stirr.

First the open disc.

Then the soft filter.

Hard filter.

Locking screw.

Add water above the maltpipe level.

This is how I do that in a slow and controlled way.

And finally the floating mash cap.

Press continue and leave the Braumeister alone for about 2 hours.

This was the clarity and foam level this time.

No ”fugitives” in form of kernels or husks.

It’s hard to take selfies while raising the malt pipe so here it’s already in resting position. All the filters are resting above the maltpipe and are very easy to remove.

I do rest the malt pipe like this for about 10 minutes and by that, I leave very little wort behind.

The ”LoDO-killer-sparge”. It’s almost painful to see.

Chilling both batches at the same time with the same water. Not a bad way to utilise water and get the main batch to lager temperatures and the side batch to ale pitching temp.

The yeast slurry in a demijohn bottle in the background and the Saison yeast.

About 70 litres of wort on their way to become beer.

Du har väl inte missat min bok om ölbryggning? Köp den fraktfritt här eller hos Humlegården där jag får en slant per såld bok!
Annons:
swish-e1439054456319 Gillar du Lindh Craft Beer? Vill du hjälpa till att hålla site:en vid liv och se fler inlägg?
Då kan du skicka en donation via Swish på Swishnummer 0700 827038.
Pengarna går oavkortat till brygg- och bloggrelaterade utgifter och inget bidrag är för stort eller för litet. Tack!

Lindhs Helles nr.2 på Warbro kvarns pilsnermalt

Jag har insett att jag aldrig bryggt samma recept två gånger i rad förut, och varför skulle jag ha gjort det? Förra bryggningen ville jag testa Warbro kvarns pilsnermalt och så fick jag låg effektivitet vilket tillverkaren säger härstammar från att det är en äldre typ av malt. På bryggdagen fick jag för mig att testa att knappt röra om vid inmäskning och ju mer jag tänkte på det kunde jag inte släppa att det kanske bidrog till det dåliga mäskutbytet (mäskeffektiviteten) så jag bestämde mig för att brygga exakt samma recept med samma metod och utrustning en gång till där enda skillnaden var omrörningen. Jag kommer få dricka rejält mycket Helles närmsta tiden på grund av det här men samtidigt kunna slappna av i skallen efter att kunnat konstatera vad som orsakade det låga utbytet. Har jag dragit ut länge nog på det här nu? Skillnaden i OG på den icke omrörda och den omrörda blev liten, endast 2Ö (1.045 vs 1.047) vilket visar att det förvisso ger en skillnad men att den inte är så stor. Jag hade hoppats på lite större skillnad, framförallt eftersom jag har full stärkelsekonvertering efter mäskningen. En parameter som inte är med i detta experiment är hur mycket kanaler i mäsken spökar på grund av fint krossad malt och ganska stor mängd malt i maltröret. Jag (och några BM-vänner) har märkt att OG inte blir högre med mer malt i Braumeistern, det kan t.om. bli tvärt om dvs. att mer malt ger ett lägre OG! Detta beror såklart på designen med det smala maltröret som ger kanaler i mäsken. Fenomenet verkar bli extra tydligt när jag inte lakar dessutom. Högre utbyte är att vänta när man lakar men inte högre OG, endast mer volym vört. Hade jag haft tiden (och en ännu större törst efter Helles i höst) skulle jag brygga den här ölen exakt likadant två gånger till. Första gången med mindre mängd malt och andra gången med grövre krossad malt, enbart för att se hur det påverkar sockerhalten. Jag läste en studie av mäskutbyte hos olika mikrobryggerier för några veckor sen som indikerade att en grövre krossad malt ger högre utbyte, inte från bättre konvertering utan från bättre lakning med mindre kanalisering i mäsken. Riktigt stora bryggerier krossar sin malt väldigt tight (0,4mm är inte ovanligt) men så har de en helt annan design på mäsk- och lakkärl än vad Braumeistern har. I skrivande stund har jag redan justerat min maltkross från 0,8 till 1.0 mm till nästa bryggning men jag kommer inte brygga exakt samma recept tre gånger i rad. Jag kommer dock använda samma basmalt och samma mängd malt för att studera utbytet men nej tyvärr, det är inte en direkt vetenskapligt utfört jämförelse.

Hoppade över timern denna gång
Jag har svårt att sova i sommarvärmen så när jag tittade på klockan i mobilen mitt i natten råkade den vara 10 minuter före jag satt Braumeistern till att påbörja vattenvärmningen mot 85°C. Jag bytte till manuellt läge (trådlöst via wifi-enheten, fortfarande småilsken i den för varma sängen) och 99°C och slumrade en timme till. Starttemperatur var 13,5°C och det tog 2 timmar och 16 minuter att nå 98°C, alltså 136 minuter för 84,5 grader eller 0,621°C per minut. Men jag följde temperaturen några gånger och noterade tid/temp och det tog exakt 60 minuter att nå 60°C vilket istället ger 0,775 °C/min. De flesta av er har säkert märkt att det känns som en evighet att få igång koket, framförallt de sista få graderna och jag tror detta är samma sak. Värmning av vätskor är smått logaritmisk och det är inte samma sak att värma från 10-30 som mellan 80-100. Samma fysik gäller även vid kylning där kranvattnet är i konstant temperatur. Ett värmeelement kommer därför vara mer effektivt ju större skillnad det är i temperatur.

Gräsklipparsidosats
Som jag skrev innan så blev mäsken omrörd och jag fortsätter använda min ”underlet-metod” där jag sänker ner malten och maltröret i vattnet. Sen använde jag min smala mäskpaddel för att försiktigt röra om från botten och upp nästan hela vägen för att undvika skumbildning. Lite skum blev det men inte mer än vanligt och efter mäskprogrammet såg det helt okej ut minst sagt, men inte så mycket högre utbyte. Maltröret flyttades över till en gammal 60l-jäshink och lakades med ca 10 liter, en sorts parti gyle. Den vörten kokades med lite annan överbliven frusen vört och Hersbrückerhumle. Ett smidigt sätt att göra en gräsklipparöl även om jag mest sitter och glor på min robotgräsklippare. Tillbaka till huvudsatsen; Jag skummade av lite vid uppkoket och kokade 60 minuter ”Braumeister-tid” vilket är 5-10 minuter mer än jag uppskattar rullande kok till, timern startar alltså något sent. Efter koket satte jag tillbaka mash cap:en igen och började kylningen i kylmanteln med kranvatten och med pumparna igång. Det kändes som det tog lång tid med det varma kranvattnet så jag bytte till min ishink och Mark’s Keg washer-pumpen. Jag tyckte att isvattnet blev varmt ganska snabbt men vad vet jag, jag var iväg och pysslade med annat i ärlighetens namn. Efter en sedimenteringspaus där kylningen förvisso fortsätter flyttade jag vörten till en jäshink där en nyväckt jästslurry väntade. Det blev bara två liter vört kvar i bryggverket med en bra sedimentering (utan Protafloc!) så jag brydde mig inte om att ta hand om den vörten denna gång.

Programvara
Jag har fått några önskemål om att utvärdera den senaste versionen av Beersmith men om jag ska vara ärlig använder jag det inte när jag brygger längre. Jag sparar fortfarande mina recept och kollar i början av bryggdagen för malt/humlemängd men det är allt. Jag laddade ner 3:an och testade men tyckte att det var på tok för få nyheter eller förbättringar för att motivera att köpa det en gång till. Jag hade påbörjat ett test av alla de programvaror jag kunnat hitta men jag insåg att det var svårt att vara objektiv. Det tar ett par bryggningar att verkligen lära känna ett bryggprograms styrkor och svagheter, att bara testa programmet en kvart duger inte. Jag rekommenderar fortfarande Beersmith efter att ha testat program som Beer tools pro, Brewfather, Kleine Brauhilfe, Brew target, Beer alchemy, Openbrew, Brewtoad, Brewers friend, Beer engine och Brewmate. Det finns ytterligare lite avancerade excel-varianter som går att anpassa till den enskilde bryggarens behov men de är inte speciellt användarvänliga och definitivt inte för nybryggare. Jag kommer fortsätta undersöka nya program när de kommer ut på marknaden dock.

(english)
I realised that I’ve actually never brewed the exact same recipe twice in a row before and why would I? Last time I brewed it was to try out a new locally produced basemalt and I got a low efficiency that the manufacturer says can come from an older type of malt strains like this. But at the last brew day, I experimented with the mash in stirring, or rather I didn’t stir at all. So when I thought more about it, I couldn’t be sure if my low efficiency was due to the malt or the ”not stirring” and this bothered me so much that I decided to brew the exact same recipe with the same methods and equipment once more. I will drink a lot of helles in the near future because of this but I can also relax my mind knowing what caused the low eff. Have I dragged this out enough? The efficiency and OG of the stir and no stir brews came out pretty close (1.045 vs 1.047), indicating that stirring at mash in do give me higher efficiency but not a lot. This seems a little odd for me and I had hoped for a bigger difference. Since I have a complete starch conversion I doubt that my malt is not completely mixed with water during the full mash cycle but there is one parameter that makes this finding not 100% reliable, there might be channeling due to the amount of malt and relatively small crush size of 0,8mm. I (and a few fellow BM-brewers) have observed that OG sometimes don’t get higher in the Braumeister when adding more malt. It can even go the other way so that more malt actually gives you a lower OG in the end. This is of course totally due to the narrow malt pipe and channeling in the mash. The phenomena seems to be more apparent when I do a no sparge. Higher mash efficiency is expected when you sparge but not higher SG, only a bigger yield in volume. If I had the time (and an even bigger thirst for only helles this autumn) I would brew this same recipe two times more. Once with 10% less malt and once with a coarser crush, just to observe what happens with the SG at mash out. I saw a paper about brewhouse efficiencies a few weeks ago that indicated that courser crush size gives you higher efficiency, not from conversion but from a better lautering with less channeling. Large breweries crush their malt very small (0,4mm is not uncommon) but they also have a seriously different design of their separate mash and lauter tuns than the Braumeister has. Since this brew session, I have already adjusted my malt mill from 0,8 to 1.0mm for my next brew day but I will not brew the exact same recipe three times in a row. I will however use the same base malt and same amount of malt to see if there is an efficiency change but no, it’s not an entirely scientific approach.

Skipping the timer this time
In this summer heat I have a hard time sleeping so when I woke up briefly, 10 minutes before my Braumeisters timer was set to begin the heating of the mash water to 85°C, I switched to manual mode to be able to go to 99°C and then went back to sleep for about an hour. My water temperature started at 13,5°C and it took 2h and 16 min to go to 98°C. That calculates to 136 minutes to heat 84,5 degrees or 0,621°C per min. But I followed the temperature a few times thru the process and from 13,5°C to 60°C took exactly 60 minutes which instead means 0,775 degrees per minute. Most of you brewers might have felt that it takes forever to get to a boil, especially the last few degrees and I think this is the same thing. Heating of liquids is a bit logarithmic and it is not the same thing to heat from 10-30 as it is from 80 to 100. Same physical rules of course apply to chilling after the boil since the tap water is set at a fixed temperature. The same goes for the heating element, the bigger the difference in temperature, the larger the efficiency (or heat transfer).

Lawn mower side batch
As I said before, the mash got itself stirred. I still did underlet (lowered the malt pipe into the water) and then I used my mash paddle with a very narrow handle to gently rotate the malt from the bottom and up to about 80% trying to avoid any foam or oxygen pickup. I got some foam on top but nothing more than usual and after the mash program I got a decent result I must say. But not much bigger efficiency. The malt pipe got to rest in an old 60l fermentation bucket to drain the last half liter and then I sparged with about 10 liters. That wort got boiled with some frozen wort I had and a little Hersbrücker. A good way to get some lawnmower beer (even though I just sit there and stare at my robot mower). Back to the main batch; I removed some foam/hot break just before the boil started and boiled for 60 minutes ”Braumeister time” which is about 5-10 minutes more than 60 since the timer doesn’t begin when I feel it should. After the boil I added the mash cap again and started to chill with the BM+ cooling jacket and tap water. Even when using the pumps to circulate I felt that it took too long with the warm tap water this summer brings so I switched to a bucket with ice (frozen pet bottles) and the Mark’s keg washer pump. I think I used a bit too little water or switched to the ice bucket too soon because it got hot pretty quick (or maybe it didn’t, I did other things while cooling). After a ”sedimentations stand” (still cooling down the last degrees) which lets cold break and hops settle, I moved the wort to the fermenter that had got a big amount of yeast harvested from a previous batch and woken up on the brewday with some fresh wort. I lost about 2 litres of wort to break material which I’m very satisfied with. I sometimes strain the remaning gunk to get some wort for the freezer but there was not enough to justify the work.

Brewing software
I’ve received a few questions about reviewing the latest version of Beersmith but to be honest, I don’t use Beersmith while brewing anymore. I still save my recipes and use it for weighing malt/hops but that’s it. I downloaded version 3 and trialed it but for me, it isn’t an enough improvement from version 2 to justify another purchase. I had planned to do a review of all the brewing software I could find and I started testing them but found out it was to hard to be objective. It takes a few brew session to get used to a new software and just playing around for 15 minutes isn’t enough. I still do recommend Beersmith after trying softwares like Beer tools pro, Brewfather, Kleine Brauhilfe, Brew target, Beer alchemy, Openbrew, Brewtoad, Brewers friend, Beer engine and Brewmate. There are some more advanced excel softwares out there that can be customised to your specific need but they are not very user friendly nor for beginners. I will keep on investigating alternatives when they pop up.

Jag fick lite kondens på skärmen när jag förkokade mäskvattnet. I got a little condensation on the screen while boiling the mash water.

Redo för inmäskning. Ready for mash in.

Jag använder fortfarande farfars gamla borrmaskin och så långsamt som mitt tålamod tillåter. Still using my trusty drill to crush the malt. I use it as slow as my patience can tolerate.

Början av omrörningen. Beginning of the stir.

Totala mängden skum efter inmäskningen. Total amount of foam from the mash in.

Detta var sista bryggningen med prototypdelarna eftersom jag fått produktionsfärdiga varianten från Speidel (utvärdering kommer efter nästa bryggning). Den går att köpa för både 20l och 50l i deras webshop. Last brew with the ”protoype low oxygen kit” from Speidel. I just received the production version that is available in the Speidel webshop and I will review it next brewday.

Totala volymen. Fill level.

Mängden skum efter mäskprogrammet. Foam amount after the mash cycle.

Lakning till gräsklipparbiran. Draining and lautering for the ”Lawn mower” light beer.

Detta är till isbadet/vörtkylaren. En vanlig slangnippel på 1/2″ och tillhörande slangklämma. This is the setup of wort chiller icebath. A regular garden hose clamped to a 1/2″ hose barb.

Som skruvas rakt ner i Mark’s kegwasher-pumpen. It screws directly into the Mark’s kegwasher pump.

Ner med pumpen i ishinken och sen kommer returvattnet från kylmanteln via den genomskinliga slangen. The pump goes into a bucket with frozen liquids/ice. The water returns back to the bucket from the cooling jacket (transparent hose).

OG på 1.047. Original gravity of 1.047

Du har väl inte missat min bok om ölbryggning? Köp den fraktfritt här eller hos Humlegården där jag får en slant per såld bok!
Annons:
swish-e1439054456319 Gillar du Lindh Craft Beer? Vill du hjälpa till att hålla site:en vid liv och se fler inlägg?
Då kan du skicka en donation via Swish på Swishnummer 0700 827038.
Pengarna går oavkortat till brygg- och bloggrelaterade utgifter och inget bidrag är för stort eller för litet. Tack!

Lindhs Helles på Warbro kvarns pilsnermalt

Förra bryggningen misslyckades jag med att förvärma vattnet till Braumeistern med dess egna timer. Till mitt försvar finns inte funktionen beskriven i manualen då den tillkom nyligen genom en firmwareuppdatering som dessutom är beta. Nu har jag förstått hur funktionen fungerar och nej man ska inte trycka på select-knappen i bilden ovan för det förbigår timern utan man ska bara låta den räkna ner. Det man däremot ska göra är att ta höjd för den tid det tar för vattnet att värmas upp för när timern är nere på noll så är det inte dags för inmäskning som jag uppfattat det utan då är det motsvarande ”select-knappen”, dvs. ”ventilation of pumps” och start av värme. Så vill jag mäska in när jag vaknar klockan 06.00 är det lämpligt att sätta timern på 05.00. Det här är ju så självklart så jag får skämmas men så är det ju med det mesta i livet när man väl lärt sig det. Lite märkligt är det att så många har läst mitt inlägg om timern och låtit bli att rätta mig… Max temperatur att sätta för första inmäskningssteget är 85°C vilket är lite för lite för mig. 98°C hade varit perfekt eftersom jag förkokar inmäskningsvattnet för att driva ut syre. Jag har föreslagit denna mjukvaruändring till Speidel som tar det till sin lista på eventuella förbättringar/justeringar. Man kan ju trots allt göra precis samma sak, värma från kranvattenkallt till kokande, i manuella läget så säkerhetsrisken med timern eller att starta värmningen från annan plats via wifi är den samma.

Denna bryggning var en del i utvärderingen av den lokalproducerade pilsnerbasmalten Balder från Warbro Kvarn som jag skrivit om här. En bra ölstil för att utvärdera basmalt är Bavarian helles som med stor andel basmalt, knappt några specialmalter, väldigt låg humleprofil, helt renjäst och utan bismaker från jäsning, estrar eller fenoler verkligen låter basmalten ta för sig och spela förstafiol. Denna variant av helles har 96% basmalt och 4% Carahell vilket motsvarar Paulaners Hell och Spaten. Det finns stora bryggerier som Weihenstephan som gör gudomlig helles med upp till 8% Carahell men då måste lågsyrebryggningen sitta perfekt, annars tar sötman i karamellmalten över på ett jolmigt sätt. Det finns även de som kör helt utan karamellmalt och med en del Münchenermalt istället, t.ex. HB. Just receptet för en helles är faktiskt underordnat brygg- och jästeknik då minsta fel kommer märkas i slutprodukten. Exempelvis adstringens kommer vara mycket svårare att märka i en IPA eller Tysk Pilsner än i en Helles eller Hefeweizen.

Bryggningen startade 04.14 med att jag sov. När jag vaknade vid 6-tiden kollade jag mobilen och mycket riktigt var vattnet 85°C så jag gick över till manuella läget och fortsatte värmningen till 100°C (103°C inställt) medan jag tog en dusch och drack nymalt kaffe. Malten krossades på 0,8mm i min 3-roller Monstermill MM3 och jag mäskade in med min påhittade motsvarighet till underlet, dvs att malten är i bryggverket och vattnet fylls på underifrån. För att göra detta smidigt i ett enkärlsbryggverk som Braumeistern så fyller jag malten i maltröret när det vilar på avlastningspinnarna halvt upphissat. Sen sänker jag ner maltröret väldigt långsamt (ca 3-4 minuter) med hjälp av min väldigt billiga vinsch från Biltema. Därefter rör jag om i mäsken men försöker att inte störa ytan vilket bildar skum dvs. syresättning. Just denna gång ville jag testa att inte röra om väldigt lite för att se om det blir mindre skum efter hela mäskprogrammet och det kan jag lova er att det blev! Det blev inte mindre skum utan det blev absolut INGET skum! Syrenivån (DO) låg på 0,8 ppm som högst men utan möjlighet att mäta sulfitförbrukningen så är inte analysen av mäskningen komplett men absolut en fingervisning. Som jag skrev i förra inlägget fick jag låg mäskeffektivitet vilket absolut en lägre omrörning bidrar med men även att maltsorten inte är lika ”modern” eller förädlad som de vi är vana att brygga med. Jag kommer röra om ordentligt vid nästa bryggning för att utesluta den parametern i utvärderingen av Balder. PH-värdet stabiliserade sig på 5,6 under mäskningen vilket är 0,2 enheter högre än jag brukar få med Weyermanns Barke men den är å andra sidan 1,1 EBC mörkare så det är helt rimligt. Dock är jag nära min övre gräns för mängden mjölksyra jag kan tillsätta under mäskningen så ljusare basmalt vill jag helst inte använda eftersom jag mäskar med allt vatten på en gång (full volume no sparge). Hur mycket mäsktjockleken och salter påverkar pH i mäsken har jag testat omfattande här om någon vill gå djupare i det ämnet men för utvärderingen av Balder så får den godkänt utan frågetecken i detta avseende.

Mäskprogramsmässigt återgick jag till mitt beprövade program utan proteinrast och vörten blev kristallklar igen jämfört med förra gången där jag skrev mer om proteinrasten. Kort sammanfattning; proteinrast i högre temperaturspannet kan/bör ge mer genomskinlig vört i slutändan, men så verkar det alltså inte alltid vara. Jag skulle behöva labba mer med detta för att med säkerhet dra slutsatser men det får bli i framtiden. Jag skippar den tillsvidare för alla öl utom weißbier.

Utmäskning, värmning till kok och själva koket genomfördes utan skillnader eller avvikelser. Kylningen däremot gick lite segare än vanligt och det märks att kranvattnet är varmare nu när utomhustemperaturen ligger runt 27°C. Jag har funderat ett tag på att köra andra halvan av kylningen med hjälp av ett isbad och en pump istället och när jag tänkte efter lite så insåg jag att jag har all utrustning för att göra det, varför har jag inte testat det innan för? Allt som behövs är en 1/2″ npt slangnippel och en slangklämma så kan min Mark’s Kegwasher-pump få ytterligare ett användningsområde. Jag återkommer självklart till detta då det är högaktuellt att vara snål med vatten i denna, numera, regnfattiga del av landet.

Jäsningen kom igång nästan direkt eftersom jag inledde bryggdagen med att mata min förkultur med lite ny vört. Det fick jästen att vakna till liv och börja arbeta frenetiskt, det gick verkligen att se hur de kämpade i e-kolven. Det är ett tråkigt extrasteg att koka vört och kyla under bryggdagen men kan absolut göra skillnad om man brukar ha laggtider för jäsningen, ska brygga något extra starkt eller jäsa kallt.

 

(english)

On my last brew session I failed to preheat the mash water using the Braumeisters own timer. To my defense, the function is not descbribed in any manual since it’s recently added and even a beta update. Now I have figuered out how the timer works and NO, you should not press select (look att the image above) because that foregoes the timer. Just let it count down and you’re all good. What you want to do is to take into account the time it takes for the water to heat because when the timer hits zero, you’re not ready for mash in, you are in for the waiting game letting the Braumeister get from tapwater cold to whatever your preffered mash in temperature is. In other words, when the timer is up, the Braumeister hits the “select button” for you. So as an example; If I want to get up at 06.00 to start my mash in, I set my timer to 05.00 since I know it takes about 45-60 minutes to heat my volume of 70 liters. This is kindergarten class embarrassing for me but you live and learn, everything is easy once you know how it’s done. But it is a little strange that so many of you have read the post and no one told me how to use it properly… The maximum temperature for the first mash in step is 85°C which for me, since I preboil my mash water, is on the low side. 98°C would be perfect so I could just go down to my brewery and start my 10 minute boil to drive out oxygen. I have suggested a change to 98°C (not 103 for saftey reasons) to Speidel and they have added it to their “suggestions box”. For me, being able to heat the water to 98°C with a timer is the same safety hazard as using wifi to manually make it start.

This brew session was a part of my evaluation of the (for me) locally produced pilsnermalt Balder from Warbro Kvarn which I wrote about here. A good beer style to evaluate base malt with is the Bavarian Helles with its large amount of basemalt in the grain bill, few caramalts, very low hop profile, always clean fermented and without any esters, fenols, DMS or other off flavours. The base malt really gets to shine here. This version of my helles has 96% basemalt and 4% Carahell which corresponds to Paulaners Hell and Spaten. There are other large breweries like Weihenstephan, who makes amazing helles, with up to 8% Carahell but I you brew that at home you need to have your LoDO-game strong, otherwise the cloying sweetness will take over. There is also some helles brewers that skip Caramalts all together and use Munich malt instead, like HB. This recipe formula for a helles is actually less important then the brewing and fermentation technique since it will all show up in the final product. For instance, astringency will be a lot harder to notice in an IPA or a german pils than in a helles or hefeweizen.

I started this helles brewday at 04.14 by sleeping. When I woke up at around 6 I check my cell phone and the Braumeister remote software and yes, the temperature was 85°C so I switched over to manual mode and 103°C while I took a shower and had some freshly grinded coffee. My Monster Mill MM3 3-roller was set at 0,8 mm and I did my mash in using the Braumeister converted underlet technique where I fill the malt pipe with grains and slowly lower it (3-4 minutes) into the preboiled mash water using a manual winch. Then I stir the mash very gently and try to avoid any foaming whatsoever. This particular brew session I wanted to see if a very minimal stir would generate less foam after the mash program and it was shockingly 100% foamless!! The dissolved oxygen level was at 0,8ppm at the highest thru out the mash cycle but since I have no means to measure sulfite consumption that doesn’t tell me the whole story about how successful the mashing was but the visuals of it gave me a big thumbs up! As I wrote in my kast post I got a low efficiency this brew day and it could absolutely been related to the stirring even if this historic pilsnermalt is not as high in extract as modern malts. I will stir properly the next brew session to be sure. The pH stabilized at 5,6 during the mash and that’s about 0,2 higher than with Weyermann Barke pilsner malt which is my usual basemalt. Barke is on the other hand rated at about 1,1 EBC darker that Balder so some pH difference was expected. I’m reaching my upper taste threshold limit on lactic acid so this could be a potential problem with lighter beers like the german pils. I mash using the (full volume no sparge)-method which gives med about 0,1-0,2 pH units higher than a thicker mash according to my test results.

The mash program this time was back to usual after my last experiment with a protein rest and I got crystal clear wort again compared to my last brew day where I wrote about the pros and cons of protein rests. Short summary; a protein rest in the upper region can/should give you a clearer wort in the end, but it doesn’t seem like it always does. I would need to do some more testing to be absolutely sure but in the meantime, the protein rest will only be used in my brewery for hefeweizen.

Mash out, heating to the boil and the boil itself was conducted without any deviations. The cooling of the wort went slow which is usual this time of the year with warmer tap water. I will try to make an ice bath and circulate with my Mark’s keg washer pump next time. I have all the parts needed but for some strange reason not tried it once! I will try this next time since this part of Sweden haven’t seen any rain this summer just like last year.

The fermentation jump started since I started the brewday by feeding my yeast culture. Those little critters went bananas and it was easily visible how much activity peaked in there. It is an extra step to boil and cool some wort on the brew day but it can really help shortening lag times and boost a cold och strong fermentation.

Förkokning, denna gång enbart med Braumeisterns 3200 watt. Preboil, this time without accessories

Basmalten som var dagens ”hjälte” eller kanske snarare huvudperson. The basemalt that was the main focus this time.

Dags för inmäskning med underlet-metoden (”fylla-på-vatten-underifrån-metoden”?). Jäshinken på golvet med nymald malt töms i maltröret som står i Braumeistern i ”utmäskningsposition”. Sen tar jag vinschen och kroken som knappt syns i taket ovanför huvan i bild för att sakta sänka ner maltröret och malten i vattnet. Time for mash in with the underlet methos (”add water from below). The bucket on the floor with freshly crushed malt is added to the malt pipe that sits in the Braumeister in ”mash out/lauter position”. Then I take the winch that is somewhat visible abouve the extraction hood in the image above and I lower the malt pipe slowly into the preboild water.

Protoypdelarna v.2 för lågsyrebryggning ligger redo för användning på Bac brewings tunna filterdisk och den hårda originaldisken. Nya prototypdelar är påväg från Tyskland i detta nuet men kanske hinner jag brygga en gång till med v.2 eftersom det kliar i bryggfingrarna. Prototype parts version 2, ready for a LoDO-brewsession together with the Bac Brewing disc and the hard original disc. I have the version 3 parts on my way from Germany but I will probably not get them until after next brew session, I need to fill up my inventory of beer in this heat!

Den krossade malten med hela och fina skal samt minimalt med mjöl. The crushed malt with the whole husks.

Ordningen denna gång; mjuka filtret, hårda filtret uppochned med en gummilist runt, en lös mutter runt mittpinnen, prototypplattan som säkrar maltröret, prototyplåsmuttern i uppochnedvänt läge och slutligen mashcap:en. This time I first added the soft Bac brewing filter, the hard filter upside down with a rubber hose around it, a loose nut for keeping the filters down, the prototype maltpipe holder, the prototype nut upside down and finally the mash cap.

Detta är resultatet av mäskniningen denna gång. Kristallvört och absolut inget skum!!! Jämför det med nästa bild från förra bryggningen som även den var väldigt lyckad skummässigt: This is end result of the mash program this time. Crystal clear and ZERO foam! Compare this with the next image from the last brew (with protein rest) that also was very successful with low foaming.

Som ni kan se är vätskenivån den samma. Skillnaden receptmässigt fram tills kokmomentet (vilket är det vi jämför här) är 96/4 pils/carahell på övre bilden och 93/7 pils/Münchener på undre. Min starka misstankte är att proteinrasten står för skillnaden i genomskinlighet. As you can see, the liquid level is about the same and the recipe between the brews are very similar (96/4 pils/cara and 93/7 Pils/Munich) so my educated guess is that it’s all because of the protein rest

Här ville jag bara visa hur fin vörten var efter mäskningen. Wort clarity test before the boil

Syrenivån efter hela mäskprogrammet. Dissolved oxygen level after the mash program.

 

H10 – Lindhs Helles
Batchsize: 56.00 l
OG: 1.045 SG
FG: 1.010 SG
Alcohol by volume: 4.7 %
Bitterness: 24.8 IBUs
Color: 6.8 EBC

Water Prep

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
20.00 ml Lactic Acid (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 1
12.00 g Calcium Chloride (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 2
5.00 g Antioxin SBT (Mash 0.0 mins) Water Agent 3
2.00 g Salt (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 4

 

Mash Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
11.52 kg Balder Pilsner (2.9 EBC) Grain 5 96.0 %
0.48 kg Carahell (Weyermann) (25.6 EBC) Grain 6 4.0 %

Total amount of malt: 12.00 kg

Mash Steps

Name

Description

Step Temperature

Step Time
Mash in Add 68.83 l of water and heat to 60.0 C over 0 min 60.0 C 0 min
Beta-Amylase Heat to 62.0 C over 3 min 62.0 C 20 min
Beta2 Heat to 64.0 C over 3 min 64.0 C 20 min
Beta 3 Heat to 67.0 C over 5 min 67.0 C 20 min
Alpha-Amylase Heat to 73.0 C over 9 min 73.0 C 30 min
Mash Out Heat to 76.0 C over 8 min 76.0 C 10 min

If steeping, remove grains, and prepare to boil wort

Boil Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
50 g Perle [8.00 %] – Boil 40.0 min Hop 7 17.2 IBUs
10.00 ml Lactic Acid (Boil 10.0 mins) Water Agent 8
100 g Perle [8.00 %] – Boil 5.0 min Hop 9 7.6 IBUs

Total amount of hops: 150 g

Fermentation Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
3.0 pkg WLP838 [124.21 ml] Yeast 10

Recommended starter size: 5.78 l / 942.7 Billion cells.

 

Du har väl inte missat min bok om ölbryggning? Köp den fraktfritt här eller hos Humlegården där jag får en slant per såld bok!
Annons:
swish-e1439054456319 Gillar du Lindh Craft Beer? Vill du hjälpa till att hålla site:en vid liv och se fler inlägg?
Då kan du skicka en donation via Swish på Swishnummer 0700 827038.
Pengarna går oavkortat till brygg- och bloggrelaterade utgifter och inget bidrag är för stort eller för litet. Tack!

Pils 12

Jag gjorde ett nytt försök att låta Braumeistern värma upp mäskvattnet med den inbyggda timern som finns i senaste mjukvaruuppdateringen men eftersom det inte finns någon manual till beta-firmware (samt stress) misslyckades jag även denna gång. Jag programmerade in ett 85°C program enligt översta bilden ovan och då började bryggverket räkna ned (bild 2) så där tänkte jag att det var igång. Det jag inte kopplade var att man måste trycka select en gång till för att faktiskt starta, något som t.om. står tydligt på displayen. Det som händer då är dock tyvärr inte en delay på hela programmet utan enbart på elen till värekällorna. Dvs. pumpventilering med efterföljande cirkulering drar igång och fortsätter köra. Hur bra det är för pumparna att stå igång en hel natt låter jag vara osagt men jag hade helst låtit de vara stilla just för denna funktion. Eftersom jag alltså vaknade upp med kallt vatten i bryggverket värmde jag även med min extra doppvärmare och det tog ca 45 minuter till stormkok för 6400 watt på 70 liter och en kanna kaffe i magen.

Receptmässigt skiljde sig inget från mina senaste pilsnerbryggningar då det receptet ”sitter”. Processmässigt däremot ville jag pröva att addera en proteinrast på 55°C i 20 minuter för att verifiera om vörten blev mer eller mindre genomskinlig mot mina senaste gånger där jag kört utan (ett modifierat HochKurz-program) och fått enormt genomskinlig vört. Så här skriver jag om proteinrasten i min bok:

Proteinrasten kan delas i två raster efter de enzymer som är aktiva där, proteinas (55–59 °C), som delar längre proteinkedjor till mellanlånga, och peptidas (45–53 °C), som delar mellanlånga proteinkedjor till små. Förutom proteinuppdelning är proteinrasten även bra för att bilda fria aminosyror till vörten, vil­ ket jästen gillar i jäsningen. Som bryggare vill vi inte ha de längsta proteinkedjorna, som kan ge upphov till disighet och sämre hållbarhet på ölet. Däremot vill vi ha kvar mellanlånga proteinkedjor som ger ett bra och hållfast skum, så därför är det bra att undvika allt för långa raster i temperaturspannet 43–53 °C. Kortare raster på 10–20 minuter runt 55 °C är ett bra startläge att testa sig fram med.
Proteinrasten kan ge vissa fördelar med vetemalt eller ljusa pilsnermalter med förbättrad lakning och genomskinligare öl i slutändan, men rasten är i de flesta fall onödig eftersom dagens moderna malt är så bra modifierad att proteinrasten inte ger någon jättestor effekt.

Jag hade inte förväntat mig en sån dramatisk skillnad som det blev! Vörten var förvisso helt fri från partiklar och fin i övrigt men helt klart med disig. Eftersom jag inte får plats med ytterligare ett steg i mitt mäskprogramm programmeringsmässigt i Braumeistern skippade jag utmäskningen på 78°C. Om den kan ha bidragit till denna skillnad är svårt att säga men jag tror inte det var stärkelse kvar i vörten efter en timme i betaamylas-området och ca 30 minuter i alfaamylas (73°C). Jag gjorde tyvärr inget jodtest som hade kunnat styrka min tes på grund av oerhört tråkiga familjeomständigheter som uppstod mitt under bryggningen.

Bortsett från disigare vört så lyckades jag för första gången att genomföra mäskningen helt utan något skum dvs. med mindre syrepåverkan! Det enda jag kan tänka mig är att extra försiktig in- och utmäskning gett resultat. Jag la 5 minuter extra på vardera moment men rörde om ungefär lika noggrant som jag brukar. I övrigt skippade jag all sorts lakning eller omhändertagande av överbliven vört och för att förenkla ytterligare flyttade jag all vört till en av mina 60l-plastjäshinkar. Syresättning med ballongvisp och en rejält jästslurry.

Denna bryggnings mäskprogram.

Jag har mätt ut och gjort hål i min isolering till Braumeistern för att kunna koppla vatten till kylmanteln. Jag tänker att isoleringen även hjälper till att kyla effektivare då inte bryggeriets luft behöver kylas. Om det ger någon faktiskt skillnad i praktiken vet jag inte men det blev mindre kondens iallafall.

Resultatet som behöver finliras lite till för att bli snyggt. Jag testade att göra hålet med borr men det finns nog bättre sätt för snyggare kanter.

Värmning till förkok av mäskvattnet. Min bryggbänk på hjul är tillbaka men bägge har sina för och nackdelar.

Även denna bryggning skedde enligt ”lågsyremetoden” för att få fram de eleganta maltsmakerna jag är så förtjust i.

Jag testade att montera prototyp-filterdiskarna i den ordning som Speidel rekommenderat men på nya Braumeistern är gängorna på mittpinnen inte likadana som på den äldre modellen så jag lyckades inte få ihop det. Ska jag köra på den varianten måste jag kapa 1 cm på ”hatten” på den hårda filterdisken (se kommande bilder). Här monteras prototyp-delen som ersätter ”låspinnen” först.

Sen det mjuka filtret (detta är Bacbrewings filter och inte originalfiltret).

Sen hårda filtret där ni ser att röret eller hatten som jag kallade den nyss hindrar gängorna att komma upp. Alltså kan jag inte låsa fast allt med skruven som är anpassad till mash cap:en.

Mash capen på plats och nu skulle alltså skruven fått låsa diskarna men mash cap:en skulle kunna röra sig fritt ca 5 cm. Istället plockade jag bort allt och tog det i samma ordning som jag brukar dvs mjukt filter, hårt filter, lås-disken, skruven och mash cap:en.

Lite skum som letat sig upp under mäskprogrammet.

Den disiga vörten efter mäskprogrammet. Notera frånvaro av skum!!

Ut med malten och en kvarts vila på pinnarna för att samla all vört.

Det ser ut som jag skulle laka med kastrullen högt placerat men så blev det alltså inte.

Mysbild på drav.

Flytt till jäshink.

Du har väl inte missat min bok om ölbryggning? Köp den fraktfritt här eller hos Humlegården där jag får en slant per såld bok!
Annons:
swish-e1439054456319 Gillar du Lindh Craft Beer? Vill du hjälpa till att hålla site:en vid liv och se fler inlägg?
Då kan du skicka en donation via Swish på Swishnummer 0700 827038.
Pengarna går oavkortat till brygg- och bloggrelaterade utgifter och inget bidrag är för stort eller för litet. Tack!

Lindhs Helles (9) – Braumeister Low Oxygen Brewing Prototype Parts V2

(For english, scroll down). Jag tänkte att det dags för mig att brygga en törstsläckande Helles såhär i sommartider. Eftersom jag även skulle till München dagen efter tyckte jag dessutom att det var lite extra passande. Skillnaden mellan en mild Pils och en Helles är inte speciellt enorma (beroende på recept) utan det är framförallt beska, humlesmak och maltsötma som är de skiljande huvudfaktorerna. Det är sällan någon större sen humlegiva i en Helles och huvudfokus är istället inställt på att framhäva och behålla de finare och elegantare maltsmakerna hela vägen till glaset. Receptet till just det här ölet är taget från min bok och den viktigaste faktorn är maltnotans sammansättning med 96% pilsnermalt (Barke) och 4 % Carahell vilket gör ölet mer likt Paulaners Helles jämfört med Weihenstephaner Original. Med lågsyrebryggning (LoDO) kan man komma undan med lite mer karmellmalt utan att smakerna blir besvärande men generellt är 10% för ljus öl mitt absoluta maximum. Humleschemat är snarlikt det i boken men med en annan humlesort på grund av mitt humleförråd i frysen. Så länge man använder nobel humle i en låghumlad tysk stil kan man experimentera med olika humlesorter och ändå få ett snarlikt slutresultat.

Detta bryggning handlade främst om att testa nya prototypdelar jag utvärderar åt Speidel; en ny maltrörshållare (låsplatta/skiva istället för originalröret) som är mer som Bacbrewings Yield increase disc, en ny mutter med lite annorlunda design och slutligen ett nytt flytande lock (mash cap) med ett mindre hål i mitten. Låsplattan var såklart den stora skillnaden från V1-prototypen och eftersom det är möjligt att använda den på två olika sätt måste jag brygga en gång till innan jag kan utvärdera V2-delarna ordentligt. De två sätten att addera alla delar är:
maltrör, tjockt filter, tunnt filter, mäsk, tunnt filter, tjockt filter, låsplatta, mutter, mashcap
maltrör, tjockt filter, tunnt filter, mäsk, låsplatta, tunnt filter, tjockt filter, mutter, mashcap
Som ni kan se låser den andra metoden alla filter på plats jämfört medan den första metoden är mer designad som originalmetoden metoden med filter som kan flyta upp och ner under mäskningen. Denna bryggning testade jag den första metoden eftersom det är en logisk fortsättning på mitt senaste test av prototypdelar. Låsplattan har den extra funktionen, jämfört med alla tidigare lösningar, att den förhindrar att maltdelar kan fly från maltröret och det ger även maltröret ett jämnt fördelat tryck mot botten av Braumeistern.

Precis som med nästan alla mina bryggningar började denna dagen före genom att sätta en timer för uppvärmning av mäskvatten så jag kan börja brygga så tidigt som möjligt morgonen därpå. Braumeisterns senaste firmware har en inbyggd timer för att ställa in en försenad start och min plan var att testa detta denna gång. Men när jag programmerade BM upptäckte jag att 85° C är den maximala temperaturen som går att ställa in och jag skulle vilja att det var närmre 95-98° C (mindre än 100 av säkerhetsskäl). Lite besviken på att jag inte undersökt detta tidigare använde jag min gamla metod med Speidels doppvärmare och en vanlig julgranstimer (16A-kompatibel) utan att tänka på att vattnet vanligtvis ändå hamnar omkring 85-90° C på morgonen med den metoden. Jag kunde alltså ha provat den nya timerfunktionen trots allt, så det får bli nästa gång istället.

Inmäskningen och stegmäskningsschemat gick smidigt utan avvikelser. Vörten efter utmäskningen såg ytterligare lite bättre ut än förra gången och även om det är en konstant mindre förbättring för varje gång jag brygger, kan jag inte riktigt säga exakt vad det beror på. Visst var mittenhålet i mashcap:en lite mindre än tidigare version och jag var extra försiktig när jag sänkte maltröret som simulerade en “underlet” men ger det mig verkligen mer genomskinlig vört med mindre skum i slutändan? Förmodligen spelade det senare mer roll än det första och ja, det är min arbetshypotes såhär långt. Noggrannhet i varje steg spelar roll i slutändan. Uppmätta syrehalter höll sig runt 0,9 ppm men som jag sagt tidigare är det svårt att noggrant mäta DO under mäskningen på grund av naturligt förekommande antioxidanter (AAO) i malten vilket reducerar syre med minskade maltsmaker som resultat men även att det är svårt att ta ett mätprov utan att tillför syre till mäsken eller mätprovet. Utöver förbättringarna ovan ägnade jag lite extra uppmärksamhet åt upphissandet av maltröret och med det menar jag att jag långsamt höjde upp det under cirka fem minuters tid så inget skräp skulle hastigt byta riktning och hamna i bryggverket. Resultatet var inte synligt förrän kokstart då vörten såg extra genomskinlig ut med fria proteinpartiklar som simmade omkring. När jag insåg att denna sats skulle bli lite speciell bestämde jag mig för att koka humlen i en humlekokpåse för lättare separation efter koket med eventuellt lite extra genomskinlig vört som resultat. Till min stora förvåning blev det inte riktigt så och min teori är att de, förvisso koagulerade proteinerna, slogs sönder i koket trots min medvetet låga kokintensitet. Precis som med ett ägg kan inte proteiner lösas upp igen men visst går det att att mosa ett ägg till småbitar… En sedimenteringspaus efter/under kylningen är fortfarande min bästa metod för att separera allt druv eftersom whirlpool inte fungerar så bra för mig med alla element som finns i botten på BM. I början av kylningen körde jag en lite (för stilen) okonventionell hopstand på en halvtimme då lite extra humlearom kan passa bra såhär i grilltider med en maß i handen. Jag lyckades bara kyla till 15°C innan mitt samvete tog emot. Kranvattnet är lite för varmt nu när sommaren gick till spontanattack. Det blev väldigt mycket skum vid syresättningen så min nya rostfria jästank var lite för liten denna gång. Jag fick ihop 15 liter extravört från en separat lakning och ihop med resterna från bryggverket. Den vörten fick en påse ickehydrerad US05 och lämnades åt dess icketemperaturstyrda öde i det svala bryggeriet. Rengöringen av bryggverket gick smidigare än någonsin och det hade nog räckt med enbart vatten och lite gnuggande med handen längs sidorna men eftersom jag har min pump med sprayboll så körde jag en vända med Enzybrew iallafall, vare sig det behövdes eller inte…


I thought it was time to brew some thirst quenching Helles for the summertime. Since I was going to Munich the day after, it seemed really fitting aswell. The difference from a mild pils to a Helles is not enormous depending on recipe but generally the bitterness, hop presence and malt sweetness are the key factors. There are rarely any bigger late hopping in Helles and the focus is on keeping the finer malt nuances all the way to the glass. The recipe for this Helles is taken from my book and the most important part is the malt ratio with 96% pilsnermalt (Barke) and 4% Carahell which makes it more like a Paulaner Helles and less sweet than Weihenstephaner Original. With low oxygen brewing you can get away with a bit more caramel malts without the taste becoming cloying but generally 10% for a light beer is still absolute maximum for me. The hoping schedule is the same as in the book but with a different hop due to my inventory. As long as you use noble hops in a low hopped german style you can experiment with different hops and still get a similar end result.

This brew session was primarily about new prototype parts I was evaluating for Speidel; a new malt pipe holder (locking plate instead of the original pipe) that is more like Bac brewings Yield increase disc, a new nut with a little bit different design and finally a new floating lid (mash cap) with a smaller size of the middle hole. The malt pipe locking plate was of course the big difference from the V1 prototype and since it’s possible to use it in two different ways I need to brew with it one more time before I can evaluate it properly. The two ways to add all parts is:
maltpipe, thick filter, thinn filter, mash, thinn filter, thick filter, locking disc, nut, mashcap
maltpipe, thick filter, thinn filter, mash, locking disc, thinn filter, thick filter, nut, mashcap
As you can see, the second method locks all filters in place compared to the first method which is more designed like the original method with filters being able to float up and down during the mash. This brew session I tried the first method since it’s a logical progression from my last test of prototype parts. The locking disc has the extra feature compared to all earlier solutions that it prevents stray malt to escape from the malt pipe and it gives the malt pipe even pressure towards the bottom of the Braumeister.

As with nearly all my brew sessions nowadays, this one started the day before by setting a timer for heating so I can get started with preboiling my mash water as early as possible. The latest firmware of the Braumeister has the built in ability to set a delayed start, or timer, for starting a brew session and my plan was to try it out this time. But when I was programming the BM I found out that 85°C is the maximum temperature and I would like it to be more like 95-98°C (less than 100 for saftey reasons). A bit disappointed that I hadn’t tried this before the actual brewday, I used my old setup once agan with the external Speidel heat source (3200w) and a regular Christmas tree-style timer (16A ready) without thinking about that the water usually is around 85-90°C in the morning anyway so I could have tried the new timer function. It’ll have to wait until next time…

Mash-in and the mashing program went smooth and with and deviations nor news. The wort after mashout looked even better than the last time and even if it’s a small progression every time I brew I can’t really say what’s improving from time to time. Sure the center whole in the mash cap is bit smaller and I was extra careful when lowering the malt pipe simulating an underlet but is that really giving me clearer wort with less foam in the end? Probably the latter more than the former but yes, that is my best suggestion this far. Dissolved oxygen levels stayed around 0,9 PPM but as I said before, it’s hard to accurately measure DO in the mash due to both naturally occurring antioxidants in the malt that reacts with oxygen but also due to the way we are able to take samples without adding more oxygen to the mash (removing the mashcap and taking a sample below the surface). I also paid extra attention to the removing of the malt pipe so no extra gunk would reverse from the lautering and ending up in the kettle. By extra attention I mean raising it over a period of maybe 5 minutes. The result wasn’t visible until the boil just got started when the wort looked better than I ever had before with brilliantly clear wort with dissolved protein bits floating around in it. When I realised that this batch was going to be a bit special I decided to boil the hops in a bag for easier separation and perhaps even more clear wort going into the fermenter. To my big surprise, it didn’t really turn out better than my usual clarity. My guess is that the boil, even though it is gentle, is breaking down proteins into smaller parts and just like an egg, coagulated proteins won’t dissolve again but it can be chopped up into small pieces. A prolonged rest after or during the chilling is my currently best option for removing these compounds since I failed with a big number of whirlpools in the Braumeister due to all it’s elements in the bottom and it worked pretty well this time as usual. In the middle of the chilling I added a very unconventional for the style hopstand for about 30 min at 79°C. A little extra noble hopkick in the BBQ-time seemed fitting for a 1.050 maß-session beer. The chilling down to fermentation temperature took some extra time due to the summer having arrived in record time. I only got the wort down to 15°C before deciding that I could not waste any more tap water. It would have to do… I ended up with a lot of foam in the fermenter so this time my 45L stainless fermenter (that fits about 50l) was a bit too small. I ended up with 15L spare wort, both from some outofthekettle spargeing and also from the last wort in the BM. I added a non hydrated dry yeast (US05) and let it ferment away without temperature control. Dishing of the BM went extra easy this time and I might not needed more than the first water rinse to get it clean but I used the pump with spray ball and some Enzybrew anyway.

Transfer of extra mash water before mash in.

The new prototype parts besides the mashcap.

Refill och mash water to overflow/underlet the malt.

Adding of the maltpipe holder disc.

If added in this sequence, a bolt is an insurance that the filters will be kept down but probably it is unnecessary.

New nut in place.

Overflow with water to ensure that the mash cap is floating.

New mashcap added and mash program started.

The result after the mash.

Awesome clarity and low foam.

After the outdrawn lifting of the maltpipe.

Boiling spargewort in the left kettle and boiling the main batch to the right.

This view used to be just grass and garden. Now it’s an orangetree in the wooden biergarten instead (my wife does not have the same name on the place…).

Noble hops in the form of Perle.

Start of the boil. Hard to see the clarity and nondissolved proteins but look at next photo:

Finally I get a nice hot break in the beginning och the boil!

I used my BIAB-bag to boil hops in.

Measured the temp with my Gresinger GHT1170 and it was pretty consistent with the BM temperature.

Lots and lots of foam.

Lindhs Helles (Helles)

Batchsize: 56.00 l
OG: 1.050 SG
FG: 1.010 SG
Alcohol by volume: ca 5.0 %
Bitterness: 24.8 IBUs
Color: 7.9 EBC

Water Prep

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
20.00 ml Lactic Acid (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 1
12.00 g Calcium Chloride (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 2
5.00 g Antioxin SBT (Mash 0.0 mins) Water Agent 3
2.00 g Salt (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 4

Mash Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
11.52 kg Barke Pilsner (Weyermann) (4.0 EBC) Grain 5 96.0 %
0.48 kg Carahell (Weyermann) (25.6 EBC) Grain 6 4.0 %

Total amount of malt: 12.00 kg

Mash Steps

Name

Description

Step Temperature

Step Time
Mash in Add 68.83 l of water and heat to 60.0 C over 0 min 60.0 C 0 min
Beta-Amylase Heat to 62.0 C over 3 min 62.0 C 20 min
Beta2 Heat to 64.0 C over 3 min 64.0 C 20 min
Beta 3 Heat to 67.0 C over 5 min 67.0 C 20 min
Alpha-Amylase Heat to 73.0 C over 9 min 73.0 C 30 min
Mash Out Heat to 76.0 C over 8 min 76.0 C 10 min

If steeping, remove grains, and prepare to boil wort

Boil Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
50 g Perle [8.00 %] – Boil 40.0 min Hop 7 17.2 IBUs
10.00 ml Lactic Acid (Boil 10.0 mins) Water Agent 8
100 g Perle [8.00 %] – Boil 5.0 min Hop 9 7.6 IBUs

Total amount of hops: 150 g

Fermentation Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
3.0 pkg wlp860 Yeast 10

Recommended starter size: 6.02 l / 1046.9 Billion cells.

BrewNotes

Du har väl inte missat min bok om ölbryggning? Köp den fraktfritt här eller hos Humlegården där jag får en slant per såld bok!
Annons:
swish-e1439054456319 Gillar du Lindh Craft Beer? Vill du hjälpa till att hålla site:en vid liv och se fler inlägg?
Då kan du skicka en donation via Swish på Swishnummer 0700 827038.
Pengarna går oavkortat till brygg- och bloggrelaterade utgifter och inget bidrag är för stort eller för litet. Tack!

SM-bryggning 2, Hops – Modern Ljus Lager

Med lite tur och en snabb leverans av Humlegården lyckades jag i absolut sista stund få till min andra bryggning till folkets val på SM. Även detta öl är en lagerjäsning så jag vet ännu inte i skrivande stund om den hinner lagras tillräckligt länge eller ens om den kolsyrejäst (spundat) färdigt innan kallkrash och lagring eftersom jag är utomlands och min fru fått instruktioner om när hon ska sätta igång kylen. Detta andra öl är också ett recept från boken, nämligen den moderna ljusa lagern med Citra och Simcoe. Ölet heter “Lindhs Hops” i folkets val på SM och mitt första öl är en tysk pilsner kallad “Lindhs Pils”. Detta inlägg handlar så klart om öl nr.2 och det premiärbryggdes på Braumeister BM50 plus Prototyp 1 där en rad prototypartiklar för mindre syrepåverkan adderats vilket ni kan läsa mer om i detta inlägg.

Eftersom detta var premiärbryggningen och jag inte haft så mycket tid att labba med detaljerna blev det inte aktuellt att värma mäskvattnet med den inbyggda timern. Jag borde tagit mig tid att testa eftersom det visade sig vara extremt lätt men kvällen före bryggningen var smått kaotisk i huset. Därför blev det vanliga hushållstimern och doppvärmaren i vanlig ordning. När vattnet fått stormkoka minst 5 minuter (tog inte tid) så kylde jag ner det till inmäskningstemperatur 62°C med den inbyggda kylmanteln. Enligt vad jag läst, och vad som ska bero på termodynamikens lagar, ska kallvatten in nedifrån och varmvatten ut uppifrån för en kylhastighet på upp till halva tiden. Jag vet inte om jag tror på de siffrorna men så gjorde jag iallafall och det gick bra. Problemet dök först upp när jag behövde kylvattenslangen till att spola ur ett fat som skulle diskas. Då ryckte jag bara ut kallvattenslangen utan att tänka mig för och en massa vatten som stod kvar i kylmanteln sprutade självklart ut. Lösningen fick bli att snabbt sätta avloppsslangen på nedre position så vattnet kunde åka ut i avloppet istället. Jag får helt enkelt skaffa mig en till slang istället…

Inmäskningen gick utmärkt med min metod att sänka ner maltröret, fyllt med malt, långsamt ner i vattnet och sedan röra om försiktigt. Mäskpaddeln som även är den prototyp-metalldel som håller maltröret på plats gav lite för mycket skum tyvärr så jag gjorde merparten av omrörningen med min gamla mäskpaddel som har smalt skaft. Sen på med tunt filter, tjockt filter uppochned, lös mutter för att trycka ned tjocka filtret, plattjärn, mutter att fixera maltröret och slutligen mash cap:en där mer vatten fyllts på i Braumeistern innan montering. Allt gick mycket smidigt förutom att jag på något konstigt sätt glömde mjölksyran. Jag hade fått i alla salter i vattnet innan så jag har inget att skylla på. Problemet med att ha i mjölksyran efteråt är att jag upplever att den blandas dåligt i mäsken och ofta med lite högre uppmätt mäskpH som följd.

Sen följde jag smidigt mäskprogrammet via wifi och mobiltelefonen samtidigt som jag snickrade vidare på bärlinorna till fortsättningen på altandäcket. Det smalare plattjärnet, jämfört med originalröret, gjorde att jag ville testa att mäska med mindre vattenmängd än vanligt. Exakt hur mycket mindre mätte jag aldrig men ca 3-4 cm lägre volym vid 62°C och mängd vört efter mäskning blev 55 l istället för de ca 60-61 jag brukar få annars. Detta gjorde jag för att se om preboil gravity (sockerhalt före kok) skulle stiga men det gjorde den inte just denna gång utan hamnade på 1.047. Om det är en frånvaro av skillnad som kommer bestå eller om det var den dåliga mjölksyrablandningen vid inmäskning som var orsaken får vi se när jag bryggt några fler gånger, om jag nu väljer att snåla med mäskvattnet även framgent.

Vörten efter mäskningen blev helt otroligt ren och genomskinlig, ytterligare lite bättre än förra gången och därför bland det mest genomskinliga jag sett! Även skumnivån var väldigt låg och som mäskning betraktat var det en riktig fullträff. Koket skedde med en stor mängd humle för stilen (600 gram) vilket bidrog till lite mindre vört än önskvärt i jästanken. Helst vill jag ha 19+19+3 liter för att kunna fylla två corneliusfat till bredden. Detta för att inte ha med något syre i faten men denna gång blev det maxnivå i det fat jag ska ta med och tävla med på SM medan fat nr.2 får stanna hemma och eventuellt inte håller riktigt samma kvalitétsnivå.

Jäsningen skedde initialt på 10°C i några dagar men eftersom jag skulle iväg på resa sen blev jag tvungen att gradvis höja temperaturen så det skulle hinna jäsa ner tillräckligt för att flytta ölet till fat för kolsyrejäsning med den s.k. spundningsmetoden. Spudning innebär att man flyttar ölet till fat med 3-5°Ö kvar av jäsningen så kolsyra kan bildas naturligt istället för att tillsätta sockerlag eller tvångskarbonera med kolsyretub. För att kunna veta exakt vad ens FG blir (lite aldrig på FG i ett recept!) bör man göra ett Fast Ferment Test. Det gjorde jag inte denna gång pga tidspress men jag vet samtidigt att mina öl hamnar på 1.012-1.010 varje gång, annars har det inte jäst färdigt. Som extraåtgärd mot överkolsyrat öl sätter man en spundningsventil (övertrycksventil) som man ställer in på önskat tryck beroende på jästemperatur och allt övertrck släpps ut. Problemet med helfulla fat är att det gärna letar sig lite öl upp genom kolsyreporten och ut till manometern och spundningsventilen. Manometern kan ta skada av detta och det blir ett tråkigt kladd som är trist att försöka få bort.

I skrivande stund är ölet tillbaka i jäskylen fast på fat. Jag tror att kolsyra bildats färdigt, eventuellt för mycket eftersom jag skippade spundninsventilen, och min fru har kört ner temperaturen till lagringstemp vilket jag följt via min gärspundmobil från andra sidan jordklotet. Jag håller tummarna för att ölet ska bli så bra som jag vet att receptet blir och att det blivit lagom kolsyrat. Första provsmakningen sker dagen före SM då jag är hemma igen så det är en spännande väntan tills dess.

Bryggningen med Braumeister-prototypen gick väldigt bra och det var skönt att slippa hålla på med kylspiral, både vid mäskvattenkylning och efter kok men kanske främst vid diskningen. Det är inget jätteproblem att diska spiralen men kan jag slippa det så gör jag gärna det. Kylmanteln fick ner vörten till 8°C inom rimlig tid men jag tog aldrig timer på kylningen eftersom jag gjorde en paus för hopstand strax under 80°C. Bottenventilen som är standard på denna modell och är en egen öppning, istället för en T-koppling till en av pumparna som min eftermonterade variant består av, fungerade utmärkt och diskningen av bryggverket gick oerhört smidigt. Jämfört med vanliga modellen utan kylmantel skiljer sig vikten en hel del så utan bottenventil skulle jag nog jämra mig för disken men nu med clean in place (CIP), min Marks Kegwasherpump med sprayball och smutsvattnet rakt ut i avloppet gick det väldigt smidigt med skinande rent slutresultat. Prototypdelarna fungerade avsevärt bättre än mina hemmasnickrade varianter men ytterligare förbättringar är på ingång vilket ska bli väldigt spännande att fortsätta laborera med.

Värmning till kok av mäskvattnet.

Även detta övervakades trådlöst via Braumeister mobil.

Den nya loggan för Braumeister. Eller ny och ny, sen är tre år gammal nu men för mig är den ny. Jag gillar det raka med typ Helvetica men även det klassiskt tyska med den gamla loggan.

Knapparna på nya kontrollenheten är lite för okänsliga för min smak. Den gamla kontrollern har tydliga klickknappar av processindustrimodell och man får fysisk feedback att knapptryckningen registrerats. På touchkontrollern sker detta istället med ett klickljud.

Bra tryck i koket med 6400 watt som strippar bort syret till ca 1.0 mg/l enligt mina omfattande mätningar. Rent teoretiskt borde värdet vara noll men det får jag det inte till ens om jag stormkokar vatten i en liten kastrull på spisen och sen mäter utan det hamnar runt 1.0 ändå. Det som stärker min teori (min praktik?) är att jag sedan kan reducera syrenivån ytterligare med NaMeta (SMB) och då får ner syremängden till noll.

Mash cap som håller nytt syre borta från att tränga in i vätskan i väntan på att kylmanteln ska göra sitt jobb.

Kylmanteln blir ganska varm, både före och under kylning på vissa områden, så pilla inte i onödan eller använd isoleringen.

Humleklet på min våg. Det ser värre ut på bild än vad det är i verkligheten men nu när jag väl sett detta måste den få sig en ordentlig rengöring…

Mäskpaddel eller plattjärn samt specialmuttern, här rengjorda före premiäranvändningen.

Muttern som jag tidigare berättat om går att använda åt bägge håll beroende på preferens.

Jag förkokar 70 liter vatten men mäskar in med ca 55 och sen fyller jag på med 10-13 liter beroende på humör. De litrarna är jag tvungen att flytta från bryggverk till kastrull och sen tillbaka vilket innebär lite syresättning av det vattnet tyvärr. Här finns utrymme för förbättring metodmässigt.

Bra grepp men kanske är den lite för låg för BM50, botten av mäsken gick inte riktigt nå på smidigt sätt. Handtagets bredd gör att jag inte tänker använda den som mäskpaddel utan istället för att hålla maltröret på plats.

Före omröring…

och efter omrörning.

Filter och min lösa mutter på plats. Muttern trycker ner filtret en centimeter vilket behövs när man vänt filtret uppochned som jag gjort här. Detta för att ge malten lite mer utrymme.

Plattjärnet på plats. Notera dess smala profil men eftersom det är rostfritt stål av högsta kvalité blir det väldigt stabilt ändå, trots viss flexibilitet.

Muttern före mash cap:en och därför uppochned.

Här är den tillfälligt flyttade vattnet återförts men med lite mindre mängd än jag tidigare mäskat med.

Och mash cap:en på plats är allt nu redo för mäskprogrammet.

Efter mäskningen, dags att försiktigt lyfta ut maltröret. Extremt fin vört och väldigt lite skum, den här bilden gör mig väldigt nöjd!

Jodprovet visade på fullständigt konverterad mäsk även denna gång. Det kunde jag dock med säkerhet gissa med tanke på hur genomskinlig vörten på bilden ovan var.

Mash cap:en tillbaka på plats i väntan på uppkok. Tyvärr går inte min doppvärmare ner längs sidan på smidigt sätt med denna mash cap eftersom den är större än min egentillverkade. Detta medförde lite längre tid till uppkok men jag kunde å andra sidan följa temperaturen smidigt via telefonen. Mash cap:en tas bort när det närmar sig kok, annars kommer det bli en kladdig överraskning i bryggeriet!

Kok till höger och uppsamlande av extra vört till vänster.

600 gram humle senare var koket färdigt och denna skärm visades på displayen.

Flytt till jästank.

Jästslurry som matats med ny vört nyligen så den ska vara extra pigg och vital.

Humlerester på en nivå jag inte vill ha i mitt avlopp så de åker i papperskorgen istället.

Jag har en refraktometer som fungerar utmärkt till att mäta OG men ibland åker glasflötet fram ändå av nostalgiska skäl.

Du har väl inte missat min bok om ölbryggning? Köp den fraktfritt här eller hos Humlegården där jag får en slant per såld bok!
Annons:
swish-e1439054456319 Gillar du Lindh Craft Beer? Vill du hjälpa till att hålla site:en vid liv och se fler inlägg?
Då kan du skicka en donation via Swish på Swishnummer 0700 827038.
Pengarna går oavkortat till brygg- och bloggrelaterade utgifter och inget bidrag är för stort eller för litet. Tack!

SM-bryggning 1

Planen inför SM i hembryggning i Norrköping var att ha med två öl att tävla med i folkets val och 2-4 stycken till domartävlingen. Jag hade även för avsikt att vara med och döma i domartävlingen men vårsäsongen har verkligen sprungit iväg från mig och försvunnit i en rasande takt med dels arbetet med boken men även en massa jobbresor vilka dessutom kommer intensifieras ännu mer fram tills semestern. Detta inlägg kommer handla om mitt första folketsval-bidrag som redan står på fat och kalllagras. Mitt andra bidrag har jag ännu inte bryggt men beställt ingredienser till och med lite tur kan jag brygga i helgen eller i början på nästa vecka men det kommer verkligen bli tight att ta hand om det ölet eftersom jag ska på långresa (32h flyg X 2) och vara borta två veckor, dvs jag kommer hem först på torsdag två dagar före SM, med en jetlag som inte lär vara att leka med.

Eftersom det är folkets val jag bryggt till skulle jag kunna avslöja en massa detaljer om receptet redan nu men vad vore det roliga i det? Istället lägger jag fokus på bryggmetoden i detta blogginlägg så får ni som kommer på SM får smaka på ölet och se receptet (jag kan dela det efter SM till er andra). Ni som redan har köpt min bok har redan receptet dessutom men jag avslöjar inte vilket. När jag ändå är inne på ämnet boken så vill jag passa på att tacka alla er som skickat trevliga “här-sitter-jag-med-en-öl-i-handen-och-njuter-av-din-bok-bilder” till mig, jag blir så otroligt glad! Två års slit ger äntligen lite uppskattning vilket är jättekul. Nu har även Humlegården fått in boken och om ni köper den via denna länk får jag dessutom en cheeseburgare per sålt exemplar, tänk vilken gubbamage jag kan utveckla!

Denna bryggning är den tekniskt bästa jag fått till någonsin där precis alla samtliga moment och alla siffror (PBG, PBV, DO x 5, pH x 2 samt OG) satt precis där de skulle och jag kunde utan svårigheter hålla syrenivån under 1.0 ppm genom alla bryggningens moment ända fram till jästpitch där jag syresatte lite smått genom plask och skak, alltså ingen ballongvisp denna gång. Jag satte doppvärmaren på timer mellan 04-06 men kom ner i bryggeriet först vid kvart över sju (sovmorgon) och upptäckte då att vattentemperaturen på RO-vattnet sjunkit till 69°C. En halvtimme senare fullkomligt stormkokade vattnet och jag kylde snabbt ner det till 60°C innan jag sakta sänkte ner maltröret för en s.k. underlet. Jag har varit lite sugen på att köpa Bac Brewings Yield increase filter till Braumeistern som (enligt tillverkaren) gör att man kan ha i en hel del mer malt. Det är dock utrymmet under mäskningen jag är mest intresserad av, dvs. att malten kan stiga och sjunka lite mer under recirkulationen så effektiviteten kan öka lite med mindre omrörning. Jag har vid ett tidigare tillfälle testat att vända originalfiltret uppochner vilket ger samma utrymme som Bac Brewings filter men den gången smet en del malt emellan för mig. Men så slogs jag av tanken att det säkerligen är ganska lite extra som filtret måste tryckas ned. Min lösning blev att lägga en stor rostfri mutter ovanpå filtret och runt mittpinnen vilket sänkte hådra filtret en halvcentimeter och det räckte gott. Inte ett maltkorrn smet och jag jag aldrig sett så genomskinlig vört i hela mitt liv! Jag kommer fortsätta att labba med denna metod innan jag rekommenderar den helhjärtat men såhär långt ser det lovande ut.

Efter en inmäskning inklusive ett gäng mätningar kunde jag ta en “mäskprogramspaus” i två timmar och njuta av en nymald och nybryggd kaffekopp i handen medan mäskstegen jobbades igenom. Efter mäskprogrammet låg DO på stabila 0,8 vilket tyvärr inte är helt relevant att mäta eftersom maltens egna antioxidanter kan börja jobba med att reducera syre vilket man helst inte vill. 59 liter före kok börjar bli lite av en standard för mig när jag inte lakar till huvudbatchen vilket jag inte heller gjorde denna gång. Dock lakade/sköljde jag maltröret med 15 liter 76°C-vatten till en separat kastrull vars vört jag sedan kokade med lite annan humle jag hade i frysen (Hersbrucker). Denna vört sammanfördes slutligen med sista silade vörten från Braumeisterkoket och resultatet blev ett fullt 19l-fat med Kellerbier; ofiltrerat och kortare lagrat för snabb konsumtion i anslutning till bryggeriet, mums!

En variant metodmässigt på denna öl, som jag inte brukar göra aktivt annars, är en hopstand. Jag ville helt enkelt ha lite extra humlearom och jag känner att jag redan har hittat rätt mängd aromhumle men inte fått riktigt ”bang for the buck”. Jag kylde därför till 85°C och lät temperaturen sjunka naturligt i 35 minuter. Redan när jag smakade vörten efter kok så tyckte jag att det var en påtagligt tydligare humlesmak men jag slänger in en stor brasklapp att det enbart kan vara önsketänkande innan jag provsmakat det färdiga ölet.

Det uppochnervända filtret resulterade i några procents högre utbyte/effektivitet rakt över och jag hamnade på 77% brygghuseffektivitet vilket är högt för att vara både LoDO och utan lakning. 1.052 på 12 kg malt och 56l finvört och utöver det 25l 1.040 med min blandade och lakade variant tycker jag är klart godkänt användande av malten. Som jag skrev ovan; en av mina bästa bryggningar, allt gick enligt plan eller som en dans om man hellre föredrar det uttrycket. Välkomna att smaka detta öl på SM och jag hoppas den ska vara precis så god och färdiglagrad som jag hoppas på tills dess!

Vattenvärmning inför preboil av mäskvattnet.

Jag har tagit denna bild några gånger nu och innan själva nedsänkningen (underlet från ovan) så slätar jag ut ytan men jag tycker det ser lite vackert ut såhär.

Vägning av salter.

I glaset, lite vanligt jodfritt bordssalt (NaCl). Jag har inte haft en dedikerad burk innan (inte nu heller) så detta glas får duga ett tag.

Är det ett vattenkok eller en vulkan? Det mesta av syret försvinner från mäskvattnet med 6400 watt kan jag lova.

Efter koket; kylning till inmäsktemp med min mäskmössa (mash cap) på för att inte låta nytt syre absorberas från ytan.

Dagens malthink.

Stämningsbild.

Nedsänkt maltrör och mängden floaties (flytare?). Ganska bra och utan bubblor…

En rejäl omrörning resulterade i denna mängd skum, bäst hittills per mängd omrörning.

Övre filtret på plats uppochned med min mutter som distans så röret trycker ner filtret en halv centimeter.

Uppfyllningsvattnet så vattennivån håller sig ovanför maltröret och låter mashcap:en flyta.

Lagom nivå.

Det kokta vattnet innan antioxidanter tilsatts.

MäskpH på 5,3.

Jodprovet visade på helt konverterad stärkelse efter mäskprogrammet.

Efter mäskningen. Vattnet är kondens från när jag lyfter bort locket.

Efter hela mäskningen var avklarad, SPANA IN den vörten! Svårt att fånga på bild men denna var precis klippt och skuren kristallklar vilket innebär betydligt mindre proteiner och andra partiklar i koket och slutligen i glaset. Mängden skum är absolut okej men målet är såklart noll. Rom bryggdes banne mig inte på en dag.

Lakning till en extrakastrull för att få ytterligare ett fat från bryggningen.

Lakningen får droppa av medan jag värmer extrasatsen till kok.

Huvudsatsens fria syre (DO) efter maltröret lyfts. Inte perfekt men ganska bra ändå.

Min tillsats av lactol vid 10 min återstående av koket dvs. ca 10 ml. Då hamnar mitt pH på 5,1 för bättre utfällning av proteiner, jästens trivs bättre och för längre hållbarhet av slutprodukten.

Några gram humle i en av givorna.

Jag har bara en huva så det blev Lützen denna bryggdag.

Kylning med kylspiral och min flytande mashcap.

Matad jästslurry till huvubatchen.

Grodperspektiv.

Flytt av finvört till jästtank.

Överblivet humleslabb.

Kylning av sidobatchen. Kolla hur grumlig och dassig den ser ut i jämförelse med två bilder upp!

Strålus erectus med humlestinn vört ner i kokt BIAB-påse för silning. Långt ifrån optimalt men det blir en ganska ok hinkarbira med hög humlehalt av det i slutändan.

Jästen till sidosatsen blev Saccharolicious ”American West Coast”.

Du har väl inte missat min bok om ölbryggning? Köp den fraktfritt här eller hos Humlegården där jag får en slant per såld bok!
Annons:
swish-e1439054456319 Gillar du Lindh Craft Beer? Vill du hjälpa till att hålla site:en vid liv och se fler inlägg?
Då kan du skicka en donation via Swish på Swishnummer 0700 827038.
Pengarna går oavkortat till brygg- och bloggrelaterade utgifter och inget bidrag är för stort eller för litet. Tack!

Weißbier 27

De flesta hembryggare börjar sin bryggarbana med att tappa upp sin öl på flaska ihop med sockerlag för att bilda kolsyra, kolsyrejäsa. Ett annat sätt att bilda kolsyra är att flaskspunda och det innebär att man tappar upp sitt öl på flaska innan jäsningen är avslutad dvs med maltsocker kvarvarande som bildar kolsyra. Det är precis så enkelt som det låter, man tappar upp ölet på flaska med några °Ö kvar på jäsningen. Det svåra är att veta hur många °Ö det faktiskt är kvar på den aktuella jäsningen så att det inte blir flaskbomber eller underkolsyrat. Med lagerjäst göra man enklast ett fast ferment test FFT för att fastställa FG men för en alejäsning går det inte lika bra då de bägge jäsningarna nästan är lika snabba. Lösningen som kvarstår är att med erfarenhet från tidigare bryggningar avgöra hur långt det är kvar. Nästan alla mina öl har ett FG på 1.009-1.011 och jag har både räknat ut och testat mig fram till att 5°Ö är lagom till weißbier, som ska ha ganska hög kolsyrehalt runt 3 volymer. Jag har tidigare tappat även veteöl på fat men jag tycker att jästfördelningen bland de första glasen och de sista från fatet blir väldigt olika där de sista nästan är som en kristallweizen. Sen är det väldigt trevligt med några flaskor ibland som omväxling och slutligen så dricker jag max 1 veteöl per tillfälle så mina tappkranar kan få vara fyllda med annat istället. Även om flaskningen tar sin lilla tid så är numera flaskdiskningen och desinficeringen betydligt enklare med Mark’s Bottle Washer.

En annan fördel med flaskspundning är att det går väldigt snabbt att kunna börja dricka av flaskorna. Jag tappade på flaska dag 5 efter bryggdagen och redan dag 7 var de redo att börja drickas även om 1-2 veckor ytterligare på flaska låter ölet mogna det lilla sista. Veteöl är dock en typisk färskvara så de passar extra bra för denna metod. Jag vill dock utfärda en skarp varning till mindre erfarna bryggare. Flaskspundning kan potentiellt vara väldigt farligt och jag skulle aldrig tappa någon öl på flaska över 1.015! Öl som jäser ut extra mycket måste man vara ännu mer försiktiga med (Saison, suröl, brettad öl osv).

NoLoDO, eller kanske LessLoDO
Denna veteöl bryggdes inte strikt med lågsyremetoden (LoDO) eftersom jag hade gäster hemma och behövde brygga med mindre arbetsinsats. Det jag skippade var att förkoka vattnet vilket sparar mycket tid vid igångsättningen. Annars är LoDO inte så mycket jobbigare eller tidskrävande än traditionell hembryggning men har jag inte satt timer på bryggvattnet så känns det trist att vänta. Receptet var det inga konstigheter med, 50% vete, 4% karamellmalt (av två sorter för att rensa lite och för att Caramunich ger lite mer färg än endast Carahell) och resten Barke Pils. Jag skippade Carafa denna gång för att få en ljusare och lite mer vårig veteöl likt Weihenstephaner. På hösten och vintern tycker jag att Franziskaner känns mer tilltalande färgmässigt. 12,26 kg malt såg väldigt lite ut i den jäshink jag maler till och jag antar att det är den skallösa veten som sjunker ihop lättare än vad korn gör. Jag har aldrig lagt märke till det tidigare konstigt nog. Jag bryggde lite starkare denna gång och jag uppskattar att alkoholhalten landat kring 5,6-5,7% ABV. Detta för att få lite mer schvung i smakerna då jag tyckt några av mina senaste veteöl varit snudd på lite tunna.

Efter som jag var lite stressad (och lite lat) så programmerade jag inte om hela Braumeisterns mäskprogram för att addera en ferualsyrarast på 44°C utan istället mäskade jag in på 42°C och när 44°C nåtts tryckte jag på paus och väntade i 20 minuter. Sen tryckte jag continue och Braumeistern fortfsatte sitt mäskprogram. Ferualsyrarasten gynnas av högre pH och egentligen ska man därför avvakta med mjölksyra tills efter den rasten men jag har märkt att mjölksyran inte blandar sig homogent i mäsken utan omrörning och eftersom jag fyller upp med vatten ovanför maltröret blir en extra omrörning efter 20 minuter kanske blaskig. Därför åker mjölksyran i direkt. Däremot har jag börjar justera pH på två ställen i min bryggprocess. För ligger jag lite högre än tidigare, 5,4-5,3, för att gynna Betaamylase-aktiviteten. Även utbytet av humle i koket är bättre med lite högre pH. När 10 minuter återstår av koket justerar jag pH:t till ca 5,1 för att främja koagulering av proteiner och öka ölets hållbarhet. Lite mer jobb men kanske ytterligare lite bättre öl, vem vet…

Jag har målat bryggerigolvet och av en slump blev det på årsdagen av min första målning. Det tog ungefär 15 minuter och förbrukade väldigt lite färg så jag har ingen ursäkt till för varför det inte skett tidigare.

Även om jag inte förkokade vattnet och därför hade ca 8 ppm löst syre i vattnet så tillsatte jag lite syrereducerare ändå, allt är bättre än inget.

27 liter mald malt.

Mäskpaddeln som jag fortfarande är nöjd med.

Nedsänkning av malten i maltröret.

Utan förkokt vatten flöt en hel del fler maltskal än sist.

Jag rör om genom att snurra mäskrodret, inte vispa omkring. Detta för att störa ytan så lite som möjligt. Det krävs två händer och inte som på bilden men jag måste ju ha en hand ledig till kameran.

Jag testade med lite mer omfattande omrörning och ja, OG:t blev lite högre men även mängden skum.

Påfyllning ovanför muttern.

Flytande mashcap (mäskbasker?)

Ferualsyrapausen.

MäskpH

”Continue” efter pausen/rasten och klättring till första betaamylasrasten.

En smackpack 3068 ihop med en kreusenskördad slurry från förra gången.

Efter mäskprogrammet har nivån höjts några centimeter. Vattnet på mashcap:en är kondens från huvan som droppar ner när jag lyfter på locket.

Jodtest för att dubbelkolla att stärkelsekonverteringen är helt färdig.

Det svarta i vörten visar på att det fanns lite stärkelse kvar.

En kvart senare var det färdigt.

Vattenvärmning till lakning. Jag bryggde inget extra denna gång utan ville bara samla lite vört till framtida förkulturer.

Mäskprogrammet helt färdigt och dags att lyfta ur maltröret.

Maltröret passar perfekt i Patina 36-kastrullen för avdropp/sköljning.

Justering av pH när 10 minuter av koket återstod.

Kylning efter kok.

Mashcap:en flyter mycket bättre än sist med lite justeringar på kylspiralen men kanske att jag borde smeka-till den ett uns till.

Kafferast i väntan på kylningen.

Jag jäste i min stora jästank denna gång då jag har möjlighet att styra temperaturen genom att byta rum. Denna bjässe går tyvärr inte in i något av mina kylskåp tyvärr.

Lindhs Wießbier 27 (Ljus veteöl av sydtysk typ)

Kokvolym: 60.70 l
Batchsize: 56.00 l
Koktid: 60 min
Brygghuseffektivitet: 75.00 %
OG: 1.052 SG
FG: 1.012 SG
ABV: 5.2 %
IBU: 17.8 IBUs
EBC: 10.0 EBC

Color

Water Prep

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
68.00 l !Lindhs LoDO-water Water 1
20.00 ml Lactic Acid (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 2
12.00 g Calcium Chloride (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 3
5.00 g Antioxin SBT (Mash 0.0 mins) Water Agent 4
2.00 g Salt (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 5

Mash Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
6.13 kg Wheat Malt, Pale (Weyermann) (3.9 EBC) Grain 6 50.0 %
5.64 kg Barke Pilsner (Weyermann) (4.0 EBC) Grain 7 46.0 %
0.30 kg Caramunich I (Weyermann) (100.5 EBC) Grain 8 2.4 %
0.20 kg Carahell (Weyermann) (25.6 EBC) Grain 9 1.6 %

Boil Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
30 g Hallertau Magnum [11.00 %] – Boil 60.0 min Hop 10 14.5 IBUs
70 g Hallertau Magnum [3.00 %] – Boil 10.0 min Hop 11 3.3 IBUs
10.00 ml Lactic Acid (Boil 10.0 mins) Water Agent 12

Fermentation Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
2.0 pkg Weihenstephan Weizen (Wyeast Labs #3068) [124.21 ml] Yeast 13

Total humle: 100 g
Total malt: 12.26 kg

Mash Steps

Name

Description

Step Temperature

Step Time
Mash in Add 68.20 l of water and heat to 60.0 C over 0 min 60.0 C 0 min
Beta-Amylase Heat to 62.0 C over 3 min 62.0 C 20 min
Beta2 Heat to 64.0 C over 3 min 64.0 C 20 min
Beta 3 Heat to 67.0 C over 5 min 67.0 C 20 min
Alpha-Amylase Heat to 73.0 C over 9 min 73.0 C 30 min
Mash Out Heat to 76.0 C over 8 min 76.0 C 10 min

If steeping, remove grains, and prepare to boil wort

Du har väl inte missat min bok om ölbryggning? Köp den fraktfritt här eller hos Humlegården där jag får en slant per såld bok!
Annons:
swish-e1439054456319 Gillar du Lindh Craft Beer? Vill du hjälpa till att hålla site:en vid liv och se fler inlägg?
Då kan du skicka en donation via Swish på Swishnummer 0700 827038.
Pengarna går oavkortat till brygg- och bloggrelaterade utgifter och inget bidrag är för stort eller för litet. Tack!

Pils 10

Sedan senaste bryggningen har jag finslipat lite på det som inte gick hela vägen metodmässigt. Det jag ville testa denna gång var en lite större maltmängd för något högre OG eller för att se om det motsatta sker. Även mer omrörning vid inmäskningen än sist skulle kunna ge ett något högre OG. Sen har jag modifierat kylspiralens ståltråd som håller den samman så min mashcap ska kunna gå längre ner och minska syreupptagningen vid kylningen bättre än sist. Ingen större förbättring kan tyckas men många bäckar små.
Bryggningen började redan 05.40 eftersom min fru skulle upp tidigt och jag inte kunde somna om. Eller egentligen började jag redan kvällen innan med att sätta doppvärmaren på timer med de 70 litrarna RO-vatten jag samlat ihop. Så när jag kom ner i bryggeriet på morgonen var vattnet redan uppe i 80°C och med hjälp av Braumeisterns två element och sammanlagt 6400 watt kom jag snabbt upp i kok. Lite morgonkaffe, en dusch och en maltkrossning senare var jag inmäskad redan kl sju och kunde ägna fokus åt att få iväg barnen till förskolan.

Inmäskning
Den mer ordentliga omrörningen gick bra med nya mäskpaddeln som jag premiärkörde förra bryggningen. Eftersom pinnen, eller skaftet, på paddeln är smal som en penna är det förvisso lite svårt att få bra grepp om den men samtidigt, å andra sidan, stör den inte ytan på mäsken så mycket och mängden skum hålls nere. Jag la ungefär dubbla tiden mot sist på omrörning men tog inte tid, kanske 3-4 minuter totalt? Den något större mängden malt och omrörningen till trots hamnade OG lägre än sist, något som jag länge misstänkt och observerat men inte riktigt fått bevisat för mig. Problemet är såklart både att omrörningen vid underlet (dvs malt först och vatten underifrån) inte går att jämföra blandningsmässigt med en klassisk inmäskning (med malt ihälld uppifrån och omrörd allt eftersom) men även att maltröret när det är fyllt maximalt förhindrar maltbädden från att bli tillräckligt porös för mäskvattnet att cirkulera homogent. Att minska mängden mäskvatten kan jag inte göra utan att introducera syre då jag måste hålla mig ovanför maltröret så jag är hyffsat redo att dra slutsatsen att det inte går att brygga starkare öl än ca 1.055 med LoDO-tekniken på en Braumeister 50 utan att använda BacBrewings ”yield increase disk” eller tillsats av maltextrakt. Merparten av mina öl vill jag förvisso landa runt 1.050 så för detta ändamål är nuvarande setup perfekt men det är aldrig kul att känna sig begränsad av sin utrustning. Hur ska jag brygga en lLoDO-festbier till våren? Jag får helt enkelt offra LoDO-metoden för starkare öl eller halvera satsstorleken och brygga i mitt andra ofärdiga bryggverk bestående av tre kastruller. Till det andra bryggverket saknar jag i dagsläget dedikerad temperaturstyrning och en cirkuleringspump men jag har inte helt bestämt mig för exakt vad jag ska göra med den utrustningen ännu, det var inget planerat köp utan jag har bara råkat samlat på mig kastruller och induktionsplattor/doppvärmare så det plötsligt blivit till en hel extra setup. Som det är just nu ligger jag efter med bryggandet så att börja göra 20l-satser är inte att tänka på även om nytt bryggsystem är kul att laborera med. I så fall skulle jag köra det andra bryggverket parallellt med BM50 men det räcker inte elen till riktigt, men det kan det kanske bli ändring på framåt våren…

Kort om receptet
Tråkigt men sant; Jag hade en del maltsorter hemma jag ville göra mig av med så receptet nedan är inte speciellt genomtänkt, ta det med en nypa salt helt enkelt. Vienna kommer jag sluta att ha hemma i förmån till Münchner och jag kommer köra med Weyermann Barke Pilsnermalt som basmalt en tid framöver. Skillnaden mellan Vienna och Münchner är inte superstor så där är det rimligt att byta nästan rakt av men även mängderna i receptet är lite anpassade efter hur mycket det fanns kvar i påsen.

Utmäskning och sidobatch
Klockan 9 var det gedigna mäskprogrammet redan utmäskat och färdigt och för maltpipan redo att flyttas över till en annan kastrull för lakning. Jag fick ut 16 liter på hela SG 1.036 vilket visar att det fanns en hel del socker kvar i malten efter mäskningen. Denna sidovört kokades jag ihop med en omgång högalfahumle; Herkules och Hallertauer men i så pass kort tid att IBUn inte skulle skena all världens väg. Tanken med denna vört var som förra gången att sammanföra med den silade sista vörten från Braumeistern och sen hamna på plasthink med alejäst. Denna gång fick jag totalt ihop så mycket ”överbliven” vört att det räckte både till 22 liter i hink nr. 1 med en ny jästsort (jag snart återkommer till) och 10 liter i ytterligare en hink som fick en liten del av en slurry BRY97 jag hade i kylen. Totalt fick jag med andra ord ihop 72 liter öl denna bryggning vilket jag behöver för att börja kunna komma ikapp med lagret inför vår/sommar. Finns det någon diagnos eller fobi mot att se för många tomma Corneliusfat? Tomkeggofobi?

Kylningen och en matta av humle
Eftersom jag hade i ganska mycket humle i koket så skedde det jag observerat fler gånger tidigare. Humlen lägger sig som en isolering i botten på bryggverket under kylningen, trots att bägge pumparna rör om vörten. Jag märker det tydligast eftersom det kan vara mycket varmt på undertill på bryggverket medan det bara 5 cm upp är runt 20-30°C. Enda sättet att komma åt det problemet vid stora mängder humle är att koka humlen i någon sorts behållare/påse vilket jag inte är så förtjust i, eller att försöka röra runt med något verktyg eller whirlpoola vid kylningen. Att det är ojämn temperatur blir problem för att kyla precis lagom länge. När temperatursensorn är begravd i humle och visar på fel temperatur måste jag förlita mig på en extern termometer. Men vad kommer den sammanslagna temperaturen i jäshinken bli när varmt och kallt blandat sig? Omöjligt att säga i förhand såklart. Just denna bryggning gick jag en hundpromenad under kylningen så vörten ner i hinken blev tillslut 6,8°C vilket var betydligt lägre än de 9-10°C jag planerat för. Jag flög blind och kunde inte kontrollmäta då en av mina billiga skräp-K-givare till den grymma Gresingertermometern gav upp under bryggningen av sidobatchen och jag inte hann ordna med en ny givare just där och då. Att kyla någon grad under önskad starttemp av jäsning är det klassiska tyska sättet att göra på men jag vill helst inte att vörtens och jästens temperatur ska skilja mer än en grad för att inte överraska jästen i onödan. Jäsningen kom igång bra ändå så det gjorde inget men en observation värd att lägga på minnet.

Skum
Första dryga 40 ”rena” litrarna tappade jag via kranen ner i mitt nya rostfria jäskärl. Det bildades en enorm mängd skum av detta förfarande så jag kunde inte syresätta vörten mer än vad som blev av höjdskillnaden. Skummet blev dessutom väldigt stabilt så det slutade med att jag fick slänga på locket, spraya med SaniClean och sen torka av både jäskärl och golv. Kanske skapar detta ett läge att utvärdera olika syresättningsmetoder framöver. Skulle det vara av intresse för er läsare?

Saccharolicious – West Coast
Som test och jämförelse med BRY97 jäste jag extrabatchen med den svensktillverkade jästen West Coast från tillverkarn Saccharolicious. Företaget drivs av den rutinerade bryggaren och hembryggaren Maarten Vanwildemeersch som dessutom är huvudbryggare på Uppsala Brygghus. West coast beskrivs av tillverkaren som ”Clean, versatile, ale yeast from the American West Coast. A given choice for hop-dominated ales like American pale ales or IPAs” medan återförsäljaren Humlegården skriver ”Jäser typiskt västkustskt med en ren, neutral ton. Framhäver humlekaraktären och även i viss utsträckning specialmalten. Kan producera viss citrusarom vid låg förjäsningstemperatur och är det givna valet för amerikansk pale ale, IPA och andra humledominerade öl.”. Detta gör West Coast för min del lämplig att jämföra med t.ex. BRY97 på torrjästsidan men kanske främst min gamle trotjänare San Diego Super WLP090 som jag dock inte har hemma för tillfället. Tidigare har Saccharolicious jäster enbart sålts på snedagar som kräver flerstegsodling men sen i sommras finns de även som större flytande mängd där en förpackning ska räcka till 20 l upp till 14°P (ca OG 1.056) utan förkultur. Med mina 1.045 på sidobatchen och en helt nylevererad förpackning jäst skippade jag förkultur denna gång och den hoppade igång ganska snabbt ändå. Förutom veteölsjäster rekommenderar jag dock förkultur på all flytande jäst för 20 l och uppåt för att säkerställa att jästen är pigg och fräsch kanske mer än att alltid öka på antalet celler. Jäsningen av huvudbatchen som fick lagerjäst i sig har jag en liten överraskning med vilket jag kommer berätta om i nästa inlägg!

Torsdag blir fredag
Sedan någon månad har antalet blogginlägg dels ökat men jag har även börjat publicera något lite längre varje torsdag vilket jag uppfattat som uppskattat hos er. En liten ändring jag vill göra är att skjuta på det till fredagar. Antalet produktionsdagar för min del ökar eftersom jag har lite sämre med tid att skriva på helgerna men den främsta vinsten med att publicera på fredagar är att hamna i rätt sinnesstämning. Torsdagar är jag fortfarande fokuserad i ”work mode” men framåt fredagen börjar friday-feelingen komma och vad passar då inte bättre än ett nytt inlägg? Fredag är nya torsdag med andra ord…

Detta är timern jag har på min doppvärmare. Den klarar de 3200 watt som behövs vilket man måste se upp med först!

Maltvägning med min gamla våg. Bagagevågen jag labbade med sist var jag inte sugen på att jiddra med.

Kylning av mäskvatten efter koket och innan Antioxin SBT tillsätts. Kalciumklorid tillsatte jag när vattnet var ganska varmt och en kemisk reaktion uppstod med kraftigt bubblande (i liten skala) vilket jag aldrig upplevt tidigare. I fortsättningen ska jag tillsätta salter före koket eller efter kylningen istället.

Nästan 13 kg malt denna gång.

Saltvägning och vägning av Antioxin SBT. I bakgrunden står min burk SMB (SodiumMetaBisulfate eller Natriummetabisulfit) som jag dock inte använder för stunden. Bägge innehåller sulfiter som reducerar syre med Antioxin SBT innehåller även gallotanniner och askorbinsyra (c-vitamin) vilket gör att jag totalt sätt kan använda lite mindre mängd sulfit. Campdentabletter eller Vinsvavla som det också kallas ibland är nästan samma sak men med kalium istället för natrium. Kalium sägs vara giftigt för jästen i större mängd.

Här är min DO-mätare jag mäter löst syre med, en Milwaukee MW 600. Lite knepig att ha att göra med och förfärligt dyr. Den har något högre noggrannhet än den populära Extech DO600 och var vid köptillfället lite billigare (rättare sagt mindre dyr). Det ska dock sägas att ingen DO-mätare tillförlitlig att mäta DO i mäsken med (enligt bla Bamforth) eftersom det pågår en rad kemiska reaktioner och det finns naturligt förekommande antioxidanter hos malten som gör mätningen skev. Man kan ha lågt DO-värde men ändå oxiderat sin vört t.ex. Men ett värde går ändå att få ut med mätaren för att kunna jämföra mellan olika bryggningar så det är ändå ett instrument värt att använda när man finslipar sin bryggmetod och letar svaga punkter. Det andra verktyget man kan använda är sulfatmätstickor som är ganska dyra även de och som jag inte hunnit skaffa eller labba med ännu.

Inmäskning dvs sänkning av maltröret.

Malten och maltröret på plats och extravattnet är på ingång.

Ganska tungt lyft att få upp kastrullen till position men smidigt sätt att kunna styra flödet på.

Inmäskad och omrörd. Lite skum men fortfarande skum…

BacBrewingfiltret på plats.

Standardfilter modell hårdare och gummilisten på plats.

Pinnen och min mutter jag använder istället för originalvingmuttern på plats och mängden vätska påfylld för att min mashcap ska kunna flyta.

Mashcap på plats och allt redo för mäskprogrammet.

Min nya basmalt Barke Pils som jag haft hemma några gånger tidigare. Förutom väldigt god smak är den något mörkare än vanliga pilsnermalten (uppåt 4.0 EBC) vilket gör den motsvarande en blandning av pils och pale.

MäskpH:t för dagen.

Första mätprovet som jag fångade genom att stoppa ner hela burken (en liten minimarmeladburk från en hotellfrukost i München) under ytan innan locket sattes på, sen kylde jag provet till rumstemperatur. Detta är det förkokta vattnet som jag ville mäta innan någon syreätare tillsattes.

Mätsonden ska röras försiktigt hela tiden för att ge rätt värde av någon anledning.

1.1 mg/L (samma som ppm) löst syre innan Antioxin SBT tillsattes vilket drar ner värdet till nära 0.0 men detta mätte jag inte just denna gång.

MäskDO vid start av alfaamylasrasten låg på 0,8 mg/l. Ett värde under 1.0 är att föredra medan runt 0,5 ger lite mer marginaler. Dit har jag dock inte nått med denna utrustning. Vanligt vatten (okokt och vid 20°C) har ca 8 ppm syre i sig som referens.

Mäskningen färdig.

Långsamt lyft upp till stödpinnarna så inget syre dras in underifrån.

Flytt av mäsken och maltröret till lilla kastrullen för lakning.

Lakningen ger en massa skum vilket jag inte vill ha i LoDO-batchen. I sidobatchen görs inga försök att stoppa syresättning mer än vid normal bryggning.

Jag hade ju två stora diskbänkar i bryggeriet men jag har sålt den ena. Jag fick ett mail från en kille som var på jakt efter en och jag insåg att jag inte behöver två utan att en vanlig bänk skulle ge mig lite med förvaringsutrymme. Sen är det ju kul att kunna glädja någon annan. Köparen brygger också på BM50 så den enorma diskhon kommer verkligen till nytta vilket är kul. Jag kommer på sikt skaffa någon annan lösning är den som är på bilden här men jag vet inte exakt hur ännu. Jag har några olika alternativ…

Tills vidare flyttade jag bardiskbordet till vänster och satte in en gammal skänk som skulle till soptippen.

Kylning av sidosatsen.

Kylningen blir inte så effektiv när bara halva spiralen är täckt av vätska dock.

Kylning av huvudsatsen. Kylspiralen täcks helt och hållet.

Här kyler jag med maschcap:en (mäskhätta eller mäsklock på svenska?) men spiralens in/ut-rör var något sneda vilket resulterade i en sned vinkel på mascap:en. Detta är åtgärdat delvis såhär efteråt.

Rengjord jästank.

Jästslurrys som ska till huvudsatsen.

Skumkronan på jästanken.

Den nya West Coast-jästen. Kul med svenskt!!

OG på 1.050 för huvudsatsen…

Receptet

Pils 10

Kokvolym: 60.29 l
Batchsize: 55.00 l
Koktid: 60 min
Brygghuseffektivitet: 75.00 %
OG: 1.050 SG
FG: 1.011 SG
ABV: 5 %?
IBU: 45 IBUs ?
EBC: 8.6 EBC

Color

Water Prep

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
68.06 l !Lindhs LoDO-water Water 1
20.00 ml Lactic Acid (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 2
12.00 g Calcium Chloride (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 3
5.00 g Antioxin SBT (Mash 0.0 mins) Water Agent 4
2.00 g Salt (Mash 60.0 mins) Water Agent 5

Mash Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
8.06 kg Pilsner (Weyermann) (3.3 EBC) Grain 6 62.7 %
2.24 kg Vienna Malt (Weyermann) (5.9 EBC) Grain 7 17.4 %
2.00 kg Barke Pilsner (Weyermann) (4.0 EBC) Grain 8 15.6 %
0.55 kg Carahell (Weyermann) (25.6 EBC) Grain 9 4.3 %

Boil Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
50 g Herkules [17.00 %] – Boil 60.0 min Hop 10 41.4 IBUs
50 g Hallertauer Hersbrucker [3.00 %] – Boil 30.0 min Hop 11 5.6 IBUs
50 g Hallertauer Hersbrucker [3.00 %] – Boil 15.0 min Hop 12 3.6 IBUs
100 g Hallertauer Hersbrucker [4.00 %] – Boil 5.0 min Hop 13 3.9 IBUs

Fermentation Ingredients

Amt

Name

Type

#

%/IBU
3.0 pkg WLP838 Yeast 14

Total humle: 250 g
Total malt: 12.85 kg

Mash Steps

Name

Description

Step Temperature

Step Time
Mash in Add 70.21 l of water and heat to 60.0 C over 0 min 60.0 C 0 min
Beta-Amylase Heat to 62.0 C over 3 min 62.0 C 20 min
Beta2 Heat to 64.0 C over 3 min 64.0 C 20 min
Beta 3 Heat to 67.0 C over 5 min 67.0 C 20 min
Alpha-Amylase Heat to 73.0 C over 9 min 73.0 C 30 min
Mash Out Heat to 76.0 C over 8 min 76.0 C 10 min

If steeping, remove grains, and prepare to boil wort

Du har väl inte missat min bok om ölbryggning? Köp den fraktfritt här eller hos Humlegården där jag får en slant per såld bok!
Annons:
swish-e1439054456319 Gillar du Lindh Craft Beer? Vill du hjälpa till att hålla site:en vid liv och se fler inlägg?
Då kan du skicka en donation via Swish på Swishnummer 0700 827038.
Pengarna går oavkortat till brygg- och bloggrelaterade utgifter och inget bidrag är för stort eller för litet. Tack!